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Conference Paper: Polysaccharides from lycium barbarum antagonize glutamate excitotoxicity in cultured cortical neurons

TitlePolysaccharides from lycium barbarum antagonize glutamate excitotoxicity in cultured cortical neurons
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherSociety for Neuroscience
Citation
Neuroscience 2008, Washington, DC, 15-19 November 2008, Program#/Poster#: 355.5/AA28 How to Cite?
AbstractGlutamate excitotoxicity is involved in the pathogenesis of a number of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Lycium barbarum is an oriental herb that has been used for anti-aging. Recent studies have shown that polysaccharides from L. barbarum can ameliorate aging-related pathological conditions as well as protect cortical neurons against beta-amyloid neurotoxicity. We hypothesize that polysaccharides from L. barbarum (LBA) can function as disease-modifying agent to protect neurons from glutamate excitotoxicity. Primary cultures of cortical neurons form embryonic Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with LBA 1 h prior to application of glutamate. Neuronal cell death and apoptosis were determined by the release of LDH and the activity of caspase-3. Treatment of LBA reduced glutamate-induced LDH release and activity of caspase-3 in a dose-dependent manner. The neuroprotective effect LBA was comparable to memantine, a N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist. In addition, LBA also protect neurons against NMDA-induced neuronal apoptosis. Our findings suggest that the protective effect of LBA was unlikely mediated by any anti-oxidant properties. LBA could not attenuate the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide. By using NBT assay, we found that LBA did not attenuate oxidation induced by glutamate. Western blot analysis indicated that treatment with LBA significantly attenuated glutamate-induced phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Our results suggest that LBA exerts neuroprotective effects on cultured cortical neurons exposed to glutamate.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/61430

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, YSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYik, SYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, MSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSo, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, AWHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChang, RCCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-13T03:39:31Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-13T03:39:31Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNeuroscience 2008, Washington, DC, 15-19 November 2008, Program#/Poster#: 355.5/AA28en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/61430-
dc.description.abstractGlutamate excitotoxicity is involved in the pathogenesis of a number of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Lycium barbarum is an oriental herb that has been used for anti-aging. Recent studies have shown that polysaccharides from L. barbarum can ameliorate aging-related pathological conditions as well as protect cortical neurons against beta-amyloid neurotoxicity. We hypothesize that polysaccharides from L. barbarum (LBA) can function as disease-modifying agent to protect neurons from glutamate excitotoxicity. Primary cultures of cortical neurons form embryonic Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with LBA 1 h prior to application of glutamate. Neuronal cell death and apoptosis were determined by the release of LDH and the activity of caspase-3. Treatment of LBA reduced glutamate-induced LDH release and activity of caspase-3 in a dose-dependent manner. The neuroprotective effect LBA was comparable to memantine, a N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist. In addition, LBA also protect neurons against NMDA-induced neuronal apoptosis. Our findings suggest that the protective effect of LBA was unlikely mediated by any anti-oxidant properties. LBA could not attenuate the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide. By using NBT assay, we found that LBA did not attenuate oxidation induced by glutamate. Western blot analysis indicated that treatment with LBA significantly attenuated glutamate-induced phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Our results suggest that LBA exerts neuroprotective effects on cultured cortical neurons exposed to glutamate.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSociety for Neuroscience-
dc.relation.ispartofSociety for Neuroscience Annual Meeing-
dc.titlePolysaccharides from lycium barbarum antagonize glutamate excitotoxicity in cultured cortical neuronsen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYik, SY: mimikammy@gmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSo, KF: hrmaskf@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYuen, AWH: angella_yuen@hotmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChang, RCC: rccchang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySo, KF=rp00329en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChang, RCC=rp00470en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros154563en_HK

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