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Article: Asia Pacific consensus recommendations for colorectal cancer screening
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TitleAsia Pacific consensus recommendations for colorectal cancer screening
 
AuthorsSung, JJY10 10
Lau, JYW10
Young, GP13
Sano, Y4
Chiu, HM14
Byeon, JS2
Yeoh, KG16
Goh, KL12
Sollano, J3
Rerknimitr, R11
Matsuda, T9
Wu, KC5
Ng, S10
Leung, SY8
Makharia, G15
Chong, VH1
Ho, KY7
Brooks, D6
Lieberman, DA17
Chan, FKL10
 
Issue Date2008
 
PublisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://gut.bmjjournals.com/
 
CitationGut, 2008, v. 57 n. 8, p. 1166-1176 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gut.2007.146316
 
AbstractColorectal cancer (CRC) is rapidly increasing in Asia, but screening guidelines are lacking. Through reviewing the literature and regional data, and using the modified Delphi process, the Asia Pacific Working Group on Colorectal Cancer and international experts launch consensus recommendations aiming to improve the awareness of healthcare providers of the changing epidemiology and screening tests available. The incidence, anatomical distribution and mortality of CRC among Asian populations are not different compared with Western countries. There is a trend of proximal migration of colonic polyps. Flat or depressed lesions are not uncommon. Screening for CRC should be started at the age of 50 years. Male gender, smoking, obesity and family history are risk factors for colorectal neoplasia. Faecal occult blood test (FOBT, guaiac-based and immunochemical tests), flexible sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy are recommended for CRC screening. Double-contrast barium enema and CT colonography are not preferred. In resource-limited countries, FOBT is the first choice for CRC screening. Polyps 5-9 mm in diameter should be removed endoscopically and, following a negative colonoscopy, a repeat examination should be performed in 10 years. Screening for CRC should be a national health priority in most Asian countries. Studies on barriers to CRC screening, education for the public and engagement of primary care physicians should be undertaken. There is no consensus on whether nurses should be trained to perform endoscopic procedures for screening of colorectal neoplasia.
 
ISSN0017-5749
2012 Impact Factor: 10.732
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.379
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gut.2007.146316
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000257646200026
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorSung, JJY
 
dc.contributor.authorLau, JYW
 
dc.contributor.authorYoung, GP
 
dc.contributor.authorSano, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorChiu, HM
 
dc.contributor.authorByeon, JS
 
dc.contributor.authorYeoh, KG
 
dc.contributor.authorGoh, KL
 
dc.contributor.authorSollano, J
 
dc.contributor.authorRerknimitr, R
 
dc.contributor.authorMatsuda, T
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, KC
 
dc.contributor.authorNg, S
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, SY
 
dc.contributor.authorMakharia, G
 
dc.contributor.authorChong, VH
 
dc.contributor.authorHo, KY
 
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, D
 
dc.contributor.authorLieberman, DA
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, FKL
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:13:38Z
 
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:13:38Z
 
dc.date.issued2008
 
dc.description.abstractColorectal cancer (CRC) is rapidly increasing in Asia, but screening guidelines are lacking. Through reviewing the literature and regional data, and using the modified Delphi process, the Asia Pacific Working Group on Colorectal Cancer and international experts launch consensus recommendations aiming to improve the awareness of healthcare providers of the changing epidemiology and screening tests available. The incidence, anatomical distribution and mortality of CRC among Asian populations are not different compared with Western countries. There is a trend of proximal migration of colonic polyps. Flat or depressed lesions are not uncommon. Screening for CRC should be started at the age of 50 years. Male gender, smoking, obesity and family history are risk factors for colorectal neoplasia. Faecal occult blood test (FOBT, guaiac-based and immunochemical tests), flexible sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy are recommended for CRC screening. Double-contrast barium enema and CT colonography are not preferred. In resource-limited countries, FOBT is the first choice for CRC screening. Polyps 5-9 mm in diameter should be removed endoscopically and, following a negative colonoscopy, a repeat examination should be performed in 10 years. Screening for CRC should be a national health priority in most Asian countries. Studies on barriers to CRC screening, education for the public and engagement of primary care physicians should be undertaken. There is no consensus on whether nurses should be trained to perform endoscopic procedures for screening of colorectal neoplasia.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.identifier.citationGut, 2008, v. 57 n. 8, p. 1166-1176 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gut.2007.146316
 
dc.identifier.citeulike5199501
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gut.2007.146316
 
dc.identifier.epage1176
 
dc.identifier.hkuros162302
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000257646200026
 
dc.identifier.issn0017-5749
2012 Impact Factor: 10.732
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.379
 
dc.identifier.issue8
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid18628378
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-48249119880
 
dc.identifier.spage1166
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60558
 
dc.identifier.volume57
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://gut.bmjjournals.com/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofGut
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshAsia - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - statistics and numerical data
 
dc.subject.meshColorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology
 
dc.subject.meshIntestinal Polyps - diagnosis - ethnology
 
dc.subject.meshMass Screening - methods
 
dc.titleAsia Pacific consensus recommendations for colorectal cancer screening
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Raja Isteri Pengiran Anak Saleha Hospital
  2. Asan Medical Center
  3. University of Santo Tomas, Manila
  4. Sano Hospital
  5. Xijing Hospital
  6. American Cancer Society
  7. Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine
  8. The University of Hong Kong
  9. National Cancer Center Hospital
  10. Prince of Wales Hospital Hong Kong
  11. Chulalongkorn University
  12. University of Malaya
  13. Flinders University of South Australia
  14. National Taiwan University Hospital
  15. All India Institute of Medical Sciences
  16. National University of Singapore
  17. OHSU School of Medicine