File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Natural history of pelvic lymphocysts as observed by ultrasonography after bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy

TitleNatural history of pelvic lymphocysts as observed by ultrasonography after bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy
Authors
Keywords3D ultrasound
Gynecological cancer
Lymphocyst
Pelvic lymphadenectomy
Issue Date2008
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0960-7692/
Citation
Ultrasound In Obstetrics And Gynecology, 2008, v. 32 n. 1, p. 87-90 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To determine, in patients who have undergone bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy for gynecological cancer, the incidence of lymphocyst formation, their change in size with time, risk factors and correlation with symptoms. Methods: This was a prospective observational study of 108 patients undergoing bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy for gynecological cancer in our unit. We performed serial three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound assessment at 2 and 6 weeks and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after surgery. Before each ultrasound assessment, symptoms were recorded and a physical examination was performed. Results: Forty-eight (44.4%) patients had unilateral or bilateral lymphocysts detected during the follow-up period; 26 were on the left side, 16 were on the right side and six were bilateral. In 39 (81.2%) of the patients, the lymphocysts were first noted 2 weeks after the operation. In nine (18.8%) the lymphocysts persisted until 12 months after surgery. There was no association between lymphocyst formation and diagnosis, type of operation performed, surgeon, operative blood loss, adjuvant radiotherapy and number of lymph nodes removed. Four lymphocysts were detected by physical examination before the ultrasound diagnosis. There was no association between lymphocyst and symptoms, including pain over the abdomen, pelvis, thigh, legs or back, lymphedema, fever or symptoms of cystitis. Only one patient developed an infection of the lymphocyst, which required surgical intervention. Conclusion: Lymphocyst formation is common following bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy. Most patients with lymphocysts are asymptomatic and the development of major complications is rare. Copyright © 2008 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60363
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.197
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.766
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTam, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNgan, HYSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:09:09Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:09:09Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationUltrasound In Obstetrics And Gynecology, 2008, v. 32 n. 1, p. 87-90en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0960-7692en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60363-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To determine, in patients who have undergone bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy for gynecological cancer, the incidence of lymphocyst formation, their change in size with time, risk factors and correlation with symptoms. Methods: This was a prospective observational study of 108 patients undergoing bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy for gynecological cancer in our unit. We performed serial three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound assessment at 2 and 6 weeks and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after surgery. Before each ultrasound assessment, symptoms were recorded and a physical examination was performed. Results: Forty-eight (44.4%) patients had unilateral or bilateral lymphocysts detected during the follow-up period; 26 were on the left side, 16 were on the right side and six were bilateral. In 39 (81.2%) of the patients, the lymphocysts were first noted 2 weeks after the operation. In nine (18.8%) the lymphocysts persisted until 12 months after surgery. There was no association between lymphocyst formation and diagnosis, type of operation performed, surgeon, operative blood loss, adjuvant radiotherapy and number of lymph nodes removed. Four lymphocysts were detected by physical examination before the ultrasound diagnosis. There was no association between lymphocyst and symptoms, including pain over the abdomen, pelvis, thigh, legs or back, lymphedema, fever or symptoms of cystitis. Only one patient developed an infection of the lymphocyst, which required surgical intervention. Conclusion: Lymphocyst formation is common following bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy. Most patients with lymphocysts are asymptomatic and the development of major complications is rare. Copyright © 2008 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0960-7692/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofUltrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecologyen_HK
dc.rightsUltrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject3D ultrasounden_HK
dc.subjectGynecological canceren_HK
dc.subjectLymphocysten_HK
dc.subjectPelvic lymphadenectomyen_HK
dc.titleNatural history of pelvic lymphocysts as observed by ultrasonography after bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0960-7692&volume=32&spage=87&epage=90&date=2008&atitle=Natural+history+of+pelvic+lymphocysts+as+observed+by+ultrasonography+after+bilateral+pelvic+lymphadenectomyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, KK:kklchan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailNgan, HYS:hysngan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KK=rp00499en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNgan, HYS=rp00346en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/uog.5345en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18548478-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-54849442278en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros145607en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-54849442278&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume32en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage87en_HK
dc.identifier.epage90en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000258009500016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, KF=35622901400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KW=13407245500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KK=8655666700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNgan, HYS=34571944100en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike2939640-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats