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Article: Chromosomal anomalies and Y-microdeletions among Chinese subfertile men in Hong Kong

TitleChromosomal anomalies and Y-microdeletions among Chinese subfertile men in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsChromosome deletion
Chromosome, human, Y
Infertility, male
Issue Date2009
PublisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org.hk
Citation
Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2009, v. 15 n. 1, p. 31-38 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To report the type and frequency of chromosomal anomalies and Y-microdeletions among Hong Kong Chinese subfertile men with sperm concentrations lower than 5 million/mL. Design: Retrospective study. Setting: A reproductive centre in Hong Kong. Participants: A total of 295 Chinese subfertile men who underwent both karyotyping and Y-microdeletion studies from 2000 to 2007 were categorised as having non-obstructive azoospermia (n=71), very severe oligospermia (sperm concentration >0 and ≤2 million/mL, n=158), and severe oligospermia (sperm concentration >2 and <5 million/mL, n=66). Main outcome measures: Karyotyping and Y-microdeletion studies. Results: The prevalence of chromosomal anomalies and Y-microdeletions in the study population were 8.5% (25/295; 95% confidence interval, 5.6-12.3%) and 6.4% (19/295; 3.9-9.9%), respectively. The total prevalence of chromosomal anomalies and Y-microdeletions was 13.2% (39/295; 95% confidence interval, 9.6-17.6%) as five cases of non-obstructive azoospermia showed both Y structural alterations and AZFbc deletion. The corresponding figures for chromosomal anomalies in the groups with non-obstructive azoospermia, very severe oligospermia, and severe oligospermia were 21.1% (15/71; 95% confidence interval, 12.3-32.4%), 5.7% (9/158; 2.6-10.5%), and 1.5% (1/66; 0.0-8.2%). While for Y-microdeletions they were 8.5% (6/71; 3.2-17.5%), 8.2% (13/158; 4.5-13.7%) and 0% (0/66; 0.0-4.4%), respectively. The respective overall prevalence rates for chromosomal anomalies and Y-microdeletions in these groups were: 22.5% (16/71; 13.5-34.0%), 13.9% (22/158; 8.9-20.3%), and 1.5% (1/66; 0.0-8.2%). Conclusions: Our findings strongly support the recommendation for both karyotyping and Y-microdeletion analyses in subfertile men with sperm concentrations of 2 million/mL or lower before they undergo assisted reproduction treatment.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60355
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.887
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.279
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, PPYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, MHYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, ETen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, LKLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, EHYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTam, PCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeung, WSBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, PCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:08:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:08:59Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Medical Journal, 2009, v. 15 n. 1, p. 31-38en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1024-2708en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60355-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To report the type and frequency of chromosomal anomalies and Y-microdeletions among Hong Kong Chinese subfertile men with sperm concentrations lower than 5 million/mL. Design: Retrospective study. Setting: A reproductive centre in Hong Kong. Participants: A total of 295 Chinese subfertile men who underwent both karyotyping and Y-microdeletion studies from 2000 to 2007 were categorised as having non-obstructive azoospermia (n=71), very severe oligospermia (sperm concentration >0 and ≤2 million/mL, n=158), and severe oligospermia (sperm concentration >2 and <5 million/mL, n=66). Main outcome measures: Karyotyping and Y-microdeletion studies. Results: The prevalence of chromosomal anomalies and Y-microdeletions in the study population were 8.5% (25/295; 95% confidence interval, 5.6-12.3%) and 6.4% (19/295; 3.9-9.9%), respectively. The total prevalence of chromosomal anomalies and Y-microdeletions was 13.2% (39/295; 95% confidence interval, 9.6-17.6%) as five cases of non-obstructive azoospermia showed both Y structural alterations and AZFbc deletion. The corresponding figures for chromosomal anomalies in the groups with non-obstructive azoospermia, very severe oligospermia, and severe oligospermia were 21.1% (15/71; 95% confidence interval, 12.3-32.4%), 5.7% (9/158; 2.6-10.5%), and 1.5% (1/66; 0.0-8.2%). While for Y-microdeletions they were 8.5% (6/71; 3.2-17.5%), 8.2% (13/158; 4.5-13.7%) and 0% (0/66; 0.0-4.4%), respectively. The respective overall prevalence rates for chromosomal anomalies and Y-microdeletions in these groups were: 22.5% (16/71; 13.5-34.0%), 13.9% (22/158; 8.9-20.3%), and 1.5% (1/66; 0.0-8.2%). Conclusions: Our findings strongly support the recommendation for both karyotyping and Y-microdeletion analyses in subfertile men with sperm concentrations of 2 million/mL or lower before they undergo assisted reproduction treatment.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org.hken_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Medical Journalen_HK
dc.rightsHong Kong Medical Journal. Copyright © Hong Kong Medical Association.en_HK
dc.subjectChromosome deletionen_HK
dc.subjectChromosome, human, Yen_HK
dc.subjectInfertility, maleen_HK
dc.titleChromosomal anomalies and Y-microdeletions among Chinese subfertile men in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1024-2708&volume=15&issue=1&spage=31&epage=38&date=2009&atitle=Chromosomal+anomalies+and+Y-microdeletions+among+Chinese+subfertile+men+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTang, MHY: mhytang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailNg, EHY: nghye@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYeung, WSB: wsbyeung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, PC: pcho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTang, MHY=rp01701en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNg, EHY=rp00426en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYeung, WSB=rp00331en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, PC=rp00325en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid19197094-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-61849097128en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros154444en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-61849097128&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume15en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage31en_HK
dc.identifier.epage38en_HK
dc.publisher.placeHong Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, PPY=12782567600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, MHY=8943401300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, ET=7103086081en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, LKL=25630698100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, EHY=35238184300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, PC=7202539419en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, WSB=7102370745en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, PC=7402211440en_HK

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