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Article: Acceptability of human papillomavirus vaccination among Chinese women: Concerns and implications
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TitleAcceptability of human papillomavirus vaccination among Chinese women: Concerns and implications
 
AuthorsKwan, TTC3
Chan, KKL3
Yip, AMW3
Tam, KF3
Cheung, ANY1
Lo, SST4
Lee, PWH1
Ngan, HYS2 3
 
KeywordsBeliefs
Cervical cancer
Chinese women
HPV vaccination
Knowledge
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BJOG
 
CitationBjog: An International Journal Of Obstetrics And Gynaecology, 2009, v. 116 n. 4, p. 501-510 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2008.01988.x
 
AbstractObjective: To explore Chinese women's perceptions of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and their intention to be vaccinated. Design: A cross-sectional community-based survey study. Setting: Thirteen community women's health centres of The Family Planning Association of Hong Kong. Sample: A total of 1450 ethnic Chinese women aged 18 or above who attended the health centres. Methods: Participants completed a written consent and an anonymous questionnaire onsite. Main outcome measures: Knowledge and beliefs about HPV and HPV vaccination against cervical cancer and participants' own intention to be vaccinated. Results: About 38% of the participants (n = 527) had heard of HPV and 50% (n = 697) had heard of vaccination against cervical cancer. HPV infection was perceived to be stigmatising and detrimental to intimate, family and social relationships. Despite misconceptions and a grossly inadequate knowledge about HPV and HPV vaccination, 88% of the participants (n = 1219) indicated that they would likely be vaccinated. Majority of the participants believed that sexually experienced women should be vaccinated, while 27% opposed vaccinating sexually naive women. Younger age women who perceived a disruptive impact of HPV infection on intimate relationship and their partners' approval were significantly associated with a positive intention to be HPV vaccinated. Conclusions: The easy acceptability of HPV vaccination among the mostly sexually experienced Chinese participants and their knowledge deficit on the subject may implicate potential misuse of the vaccines and a false sense of security against cervical cancer. There is a dire need for culturally sensitive and tailored education for the public, women of different ages and their partners about HPV and HPV vaccination. Emphasis must be placed on the prophylactic nature of the current vaccines, the uncertain effects when given to sexually experienced women, the importance of adolescent vaccination and the need for continued cervical screening whether vaccinated or not. © 2009 The Authors.
 
ISSN1470-0328
2013 Impact Factor: 3.862
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2008.01988.x
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000263449400006
Funding AgencyGrant Number
The Wong Check She Charitable Foundation
The University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This study was jointly funded by The Wong Check She Charitable Foundation and The Research Fund from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Hong Kong.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorKwan, TTC
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, KKL
 
dc.contributor.authorYip, AMW
 
dc.contributor.authorTam, KF
 
dc.contributor.authorCheung, ANY
 
dc.contributor.authorLo, SST
 
dc.contributor.authorLee, PWH
 
dc.contributor.authorNgan, HYS
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:08:53Z
 
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:08:53Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractObjective: To explore Chinese women's perceptions of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and their intention to be vaccinated. Design: A cross-sectional community-based survey study. Setting: Thirteen community women's health centres of The Family Planning Association of Hong Kong. Sample: A total of 1450 ethnic Chinese women aged 18 or above who attended the health centres. Methods: Participants completed a written consent and an anonymous questionnaire onsite. Main outcome measures: Knowledge and beliefs about HPV and HPV vaccination against cervical cancer and participants' own intention to be vaccinated. Results: About 38% of the participants (n = 527) had heard of HPV and 50% (n = 697) had heard of vaccination against cervical cancer. HPV infection was perceived to be stigmatising and detrimental to intimate, family and social relationships. Despite misconceptions and a grossly inadequate knowledge about HPV and HPV vaccination, 88% of the participants (n = 1219) indicated that they would likely be vaccinated. Majority of the participants believed that sexually experienced women should be vaccinated, while 27% opposed vaccinating sexually naive women. Younger age women who perceived a disruptive impact of HPV infection on intimate relationship and their partners' approval were significantly associated with a positive intention to be HPV vaccinated. Conclusions: The easy acceptability of HPV vaccination among the mostly sexually experienced Chinese participants and their knowledge deficit on the subject may implicate potential misuse of the vaccines and a false sense of security against cervical cancer. There is a dire need for culturally sensitive and tailored education for the public, women of different ages and their partners about HPV and HPV vaccination. Emphasis must be placed on the prophylactic nature of the current vaccines, the uncertain effects when given to sexually experienced women, the importance of adolescent vaccination and the need for continued cervical screening whether vaccinated or not. © 2009 The Authors.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationBjog: An International Journal Of Obstetrics And Gynaecology, 2009, v. 116 n. 4, p. 501-510 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2008.01988.x
 
dc.identifier.citeulike4090043
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2008.01988.x
 
dc.identifier.epage510
 
dc.identifier.hkuros155768
 
dc.identifier.hkuros167539
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000263449400006
Funding AgencyGrant Number
The Wong Check She Charitable Foundation
The University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This study was jointly funded by The Wong Check She Charitable Foundation and The Research Fund from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Hong Kong.

 
dc.identifier.issn1470-0328
2013 Impact Factor: 3.862
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.pmid19250361
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-60449093571
 
dc.identifier.spage501
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60350
 
dc.identifier.volume116
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BJOG
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofBJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studies
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
 
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshPapillomavirus Infections - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
 
dc.subject.meshPapillomavirus Vaccines
 
dc.subject.meshPatient Satisfaction - ethnology
 
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires
 
dc.subject.meshUterine Cervical Neoplasms - ethnology - virology
 
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult
 
dc.subjectBeliefs
 
dc.subjectCervical cancer
 
dc.subjectChinese women
 
dc.subjectHPV vaccination
 
dc.subjectKnowledge
 
dc.titleAcceptability of human papillomavirus vaccination among Chinese women: Concerns and implications
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Lo, SST</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong
  3. Division of Gynaecological Oncology
  4. Family Planning Association of Hong Kong