File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: High density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels increase with age in American women but not in Hong Kong Chinese women

TitleHigh density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels increase with age in American women but not in Hong Kong Chinese women
Authors
KeywordsChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
Issue Date2009
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664
Citation
Clinical Endocrinology, 2009, v. 70 n. 4, p. 561-568 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol is a powerful cardiovascular risk factor. Important gender and ethnic differences in plasma HDL levels exist and warrant investigation. Design Cross-sectional survey in two different general populations. Patients 7700 participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2002 and 1944 participants of the Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Prevalence Study-2 (CRISPS2) 2000-2004. Measurements Plasma HDL levels. Results Plasma HDL levels were higher in women than in men in both populations. In the United States women, it increased with age, whereas in Chinese women, it declined with age and converged with male HDL levels. In the United States, 37·1 ± 1·2% men and 38·9 ± 1·1% women had low HDL levels. In Hong Kong, 34·3 ± 1·6% men and 34·5 ± 1·5% women had low HDL levels. In Americans, the independent predictors of low HDL levels were lower age, being non-Mexican Hispanic, waist circumference, triglycerides and not drinking alcohol in men, and lower age, being Hispanic, waist circumference, triglycerides, current smoking and not drinking alcohol in women. In Hong Kong Chinese, the independent predictors of low HDL levels were body mass index, triglycerides, current smoking and not drinking alcohol in men, and lower age, waist circumference, triglycerides, diabetes and former smoking in women. Conclusions The decline in plasma HDL with age in Chinese women is opposite to that seen in American women. The increased cardiovascular risk in elderly Chinese women requires further study. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60274
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.487
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.314
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Research Grants Council7229/01 m
Health Care & Promotion Fund Committee Research212907
Funding Information:

BMY Cheung and CP Lau were investigators in a clinical study involving Niaspan funded by Merck.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorOng, KLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWat, NMSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTam, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPang, RWCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJanus, EDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, CPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:07:21Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:07:21Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Endocrinology, 2009, v. 70 n. 4, p. 561-568en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0300-0664en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/60274-
dc.description.abstractObjectives High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol is a powerful cardiovascular risk factor. Important gender and ethnic differences in plasma HDL levels exist and warrant investigation. Design Cross-sectional survey in two different general populations. Patients 7700 participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2002 and 1944 participants of the Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Prevalence Study-2 (CRISPS2) 2000-2004. Measurements Plasma HDL levels. Results Plasma HDL levels were higher in women than in men in both populations. In the United States women, it increased with age, whereas in Chinese women, it declined with age and converged with male HDL levels. In the United States, 37·1 ± 1·2% men and 38·9 ± 1·1% women had low HDL levels. In Hong Kong, 34·3 ± 1·6% men and 34·5 ± 1·5% women had low HDL levels. In Americans, the independent predictors of low HDL levels were lower age, being non-Mexican Hispanic, waist circumference, triglycerides and not drinking alcohol in men, and lower age, being Hispanic, waist circumference, triglycerides, current smoking and not drinking alcohol in women. In Hong Kong Chinese, the independent predictors of low HDL levels were body mass index, triglycerides, current smoking and not drinking alcohol in men, and lower age, waist circumference, triglycerides, diabetes and former smoking in women. Conclusions The decline in plasma HDL with age in Chinese women is opposite to that seen in American women. The increased cardiovascular risk in elderly Chinese women requires further study. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Endocrinologyen_HK
dc.subjectChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers-
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_HK
dc.subject.meshAging - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - ethnologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCholesterol, HDL - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshHypercholesterolemia - blood - ethnologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshNutrition Surveysen_HK
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSex Characteristicsen_HK
dc.subject.meshUnited States - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.titleHigh density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels increase with age in American women but not in Hong Kong Chinese womenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BMY: mycheung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPang, RWC: robertap@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL: ksllam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BMY=rp01321en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPang, RWC=rp00274en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2265.2008.03361.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18715284-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-61449186540en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros162214en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-61449186540&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume70en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage561en_HK
dc.identifier.epage568en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000263856300010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.relation.projectImpaired glucose tolerance as a marker for cardiovascular risk-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, BMY=7103294806en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, M=26661782700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOng, KL=8340854000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWat, NMS=6602131754en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, S=7202037323en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPang, RWC=7004376659en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, GN=35465269900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, J=36040369400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJanus, ED=7006936536en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, CP=7401968501en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KSL=8082870600en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike4145910-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats