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Article: Laparoscopic surgery induced interleukin-6 levels in serum and gut mucosa: Implications of peritoneum integrity and gas factors

TitleLaparoscopic surgery induced interleukin-6 levels in serum and gut mucosa: Implications of peritoneum integrity and gas factors
Authors
KeywordsGut mucosa
Interleukin-6
Laparoscopy
Peritoneum
Postoperative stress response
Issue Date2009
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00464/
Citation
Surgical Endoscopy And Other Interventional Techniques, 2009, v. 23 n. 2, p. 370-376 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The peritoneum serves as an integral part of host immunity, and the homeostasis of intraperitoneal environment is held to be beneficial for patient recovery after abdominal surgery. How minimal invasive access to the abdomen by laparoscopy and incisions would alter the intraperitoneal immune response is not fully defined. This study examined the levels of IL-6 in serum and gut mucosa following laparoscopic surgery with reference to the peritoneum integrity and gas factors. Methods: BALB/c mice were divided into three groups (ten animals in each group) that underwent different abdominal surgical treatments: laparotomy (open group), laparoscopy with atmospheric air (air group) or carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum (CO 2 group). A 3-cm incision of the skin and muscle was made in all animals except the peritoneum was left intact in the latter two animal groups in order to cancel out the incisional tissue injury present in laparotomy. Four hours after surgery, serum, and jejunal mucosa were extracted for IL-6 measurement by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: Open laparotomy resulted in significant elevation of serum IL-6 level when compared to the laparoscopic procedures in the descending order of open > air > CO 2 groups. For the mucosal IL-6 level, both the open and air groups were significantly higher than the CO 2 group. Data from multivariate analysis revealed that breaching or incision of the peritoneum was an important factor for the elevated levels of IL-6 in serum (p < 0.001) and jejunal mucosa (p = 0.032). Conclusion: The present study suggests that laparoscopic techniques to minimize the size of the peritoneal incision as well as exposure to atmospheric air can potentially reduce postoperative stress responses associated with abdominal surgery and prompt early recovery. © 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59941
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.54
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.695
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of Hong KongHKU732002M
CRCG committee of the University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

The work was supported by grants from the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong (HKU732002M) and the research seed fund from the CRCG committee of the University of Hong Kong. The authors would like to thank the superb assistance of Dr. Jana Wo and Mr. Jensen To on animal surgery.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuk, JMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTung, PHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLaw, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T04:00:34Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-31T04:00:34Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSurgical Endoscopy And Other Interventional Techniques, 2009, v. 23 n. 2, p. 370-376en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0930-2794en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59941-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The peritoneum serves as an integral part of host immunity, and the homeostasis of intraperitoneal environment is held to be beneficial for patient recovery after abdominal surgery. How minimal invasive access to the abdomen by laparoscopy and incisions would alter the intraperitoneal immune response is not fully defined. This study examined the levels of IL-6 in serum and gut mucosa following laparoscopic surgery with reference to the peritoneum integrity and gas factors. Methods: BALB/c mice were divided into three groups (ten animals in each group) that underwent different abdominal surgical treatments: laparotomy (open group), laparoscopy with atmospheric air (air group) or carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum (CO 2 group). A 3-cm incision of the skin and muscle was made in all animals except the peritoneum was left intact in the latter two animal groups in order to cancel out the incisional tissue injury present in laparotomy. Four hours after surgery, serum, and jejunal mucosa were extracted for IL-6 measurement by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: Open laparotomy resulted in significant elevation of serum IL-6 level when compared to the laparoscopic procedures in the descending order of open > air > CO 2 groups. For the mucosal IL-6 level, both the open and air groups were significantly higher than the CO 2 group. Data from multivariate analysis revealed that breaching or incision of the peritoneum was an important factor for the elevated levels of IL-6 in serum (p < 0.001) and jejunal mucosa (p = 0.032). Conclusion: The present study suggests that laparoscopic techniques to minimize the size of the peritoneal incision as well as exposure to atmospheric air can potentially reduce postoperative stress responses associated with abdominal surgery and prompt early recovery. © 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00464/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniquesen_HK
dc.subjectGut mucosaen_HK
dc.subjectInterleukin-6en_HK
dc.subjectLaparoscopyen_HK
dc.subjectPeritoneumen_HK
dc.subjectPostoperative stress responseen_HK
dc.titleLaparoscopic surgery induced interleukin-6 levels in serum and gut mucosa: Implications of peritoneum integrity and gas factorsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLuk, JM: jmluk@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLaw, S: slaw@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, J: jwong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, JM=rp00349en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, S=rp00437en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, J=rp00322en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00464-008-9948-2en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-65249096574en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros146016en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-65249096574&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume23en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage370en_HK
dc.identifier.epage376en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000262703000023-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuk, JM=7006777791en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTung, PH=7006585735en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, KF=35081410800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KL=37004089600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, S=7202241293en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, J=8049324500en_HK

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