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Article: Quality of life in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux
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TitleQuality of life in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux
 
AuthorsCheung, TK
Lam, PKY1
Wei, WI1
Wong, WM
Ng, ML1
Gu, Q
Hung, IF
Wong, BCY1
 
KeywordsAnxiety
Depression
Gastroesophageal reflux disease
Laryngopharyngeal reflux
Quality of life
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/DIG
 
CitationDigestion, 2009, v. 79 n. 1, p. 52-57 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000205267
 
AbstractBackground: Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) disease is an extraesophageal manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The impact of GERD-related LPR on the psychological well-being and quality of life (QOL) in Chinese is not known. Aim: To assess the QOL in patients with LPR disease. Methods: 76 LPR and 73 healthy subjects were recruited. Psychological well-being was assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score and QOL was assessed by SF-36. Results: 51/76 (67.1%) patients had GERD-related LPR. More LPR subjects had taken sick leave (36.2 vs. 5.6%, p = 0.001) and reported adverse social life impact (60.5 vs. 38.9%, p = 0.013). LPR patients showed significantly worse results on the Voice Handicap Index (47.8 vs. 7.6, p = 0.001), were more anxious and had worse QOL in social functioning, pain and general health perception domains of SF-36. GERD-related LPR subjects had a higher depression score (4.8 vs. 3.8, p = 0.014) and a lower mental summary score (41.8 vs. 48.4, p = 0.01) in SF-36 compared with those without GERD. Conclusions: LPR had a negative impact on psychological status, social functioning and QOL. GERD symptoms appeared to be the main contributor to decrease QOL. GERD-related LPR patients had a significant impact on the mental component of their QOL. © 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.
 
ISSN0012-2823
2013 Impact Factor: 2.032
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000205267
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000264026200011
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Shun Tak District Min Yuen Tong Gastroenterology Research Fund
Funding Information:

This project is sponsored by Shun Tak District Min Yuen Tong Gastroenterology Research Fund.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorCheung, TK
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, PKY
 
dc.contributor.authorWei, WI
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, WM
 
dc.contributor.authorNg, ML
 
dc.contributor.authorGu, Q
 
dc.contributor.authorHung, IF
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, BCY
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:48:34Z
 
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:48:34Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) disease is an extraesophageal manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The impact of GERD-related LPR on the psychological well-being and quality of life (QOL) in Chinese is not known. Aim: To assess the QOL in patients with LPR disease. Methods: 76 LPR and 73 healthy subjects were recruited. Psychological well-being was assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score and QOL was assessed by SF-36. Results: 51/76 (67.1%) patients had GERD-related LPR. More LPR subjects had taken sick leave (36.2 vs. 5.6%, p = 0.001) and reported adverse social life impact (60.5 vs. 38.9%, p = 0.013). LPR patients showed significantly worse results on the Voice Handicap Index (47.8 vs. 7.6, p = 0.001), were more anxious and had worse QOL in social functioning, pain and general health perception domains of SF-36. GERD-related LPR subjects had a higher depression score (4.8 vs. 3.8, p = 0.014) and a lower mental summary score (41.8 vs. 48.4, p = 0.01) in SF-36 compared with those without GERD. Conclusions: LPR had a negative impact on psychological status, social functioning and QOL. GERD symptoms appeared to be the main contributor to decrease QOL. GERD-related LPR patients had a significant impact on the mental component of their QOL. © 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationDigestion, 2009, v. 79 n. 1, p. 52-57 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000205267
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000205267
 
dc.identifier.epage57
 
dc.identifier.hkuros154936
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000264026200011
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Shun Tak District Min Yuen Tong Gastroenterology Research Fund
Funding Information:

This project is sponsored by Shun Tak District Min Yuen Tong Gastroenterology Research Fund.

 
dc.identifier.issn0012-2823
2013 Impact Factor: 2.032
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid19252403
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-60949088870
 
dc.identifier.spage52
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59368
 
dc.identifier.volume79
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/DIG
 
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland
 
dc.relation.ispartofDigestion
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsDigestion. Copyright © S Karger AG.
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies
 
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distribution
 
dc.subject.meshChina
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshGastroesophageal Reflux - psychology
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshLaryngeal Diseases - psychology
 
dc.subject.meshLaryngoscopy
 
dc.subject.meshLogistic Models
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshPharyngeal Diseases - psychology
 
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scales
 
dc.subject.meshQuality of Life
 
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires
 
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors
 
dc.subjectAnxiety
 
dc.subjectDepression
 
dc.subjectGastroesophageal reflux disease
 
dc.subjectLaryngopharyngeal reflux
 
dc.subjectQuality of life
 
dc.titleQuality of life in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong