File Download
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: Circulating levels of adipocyte and epidermal fatty acid-binding proteins in relation to nephropathy staging and macrovascular complications in type 2 diabetic patients
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleCirculating levels of adipocyte and epidermal fatty acid-binding proteins in relation to nephropathy staging and macrovascular complications in type 2 diabetic patients
 
AuthorsYeung, DCY1
Xu, A1
Tso, AWK1
Chow, WS1
Wat, NMS1
Fong, CHY1
Tam, S2
Sham, PC1
Lam, KSL1
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherAmerican Diabetes Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/
 
CitationDiabetes Care, 2009, v. 32 n. 1, p. 132-134 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc08-1333
 
AbstractOBJECTIVE - To investigate the relationships of serum adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (A-FABP) and epidermal fatty acid-binding protein (E-FABP) with renal dysfunction and macrovascular complications in type 2 diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS- The associations of serum A-FABP and E-FABP with markers of renal function, nephropathy staging, and macrovascular complications were examined in 237 type 2 diabetic patients. RESULTS - Serum A-FABP and E-FABP correlated significantly with serum creatinine, mean albumin excretion rate, and glomerular filtration rate (all P < 0.001) and were independently associated with diabetic nephropathy staging (P = 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Circulating levels of both types of FABP were increased (P < 0.01) in subjects with macrovascular complications. Serum A-FABP was independently associated with macrovascular complications (odds ratio 2.92 [95% CI 1.42-6.01]; P = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS - Serum A-FABP and E-FABP might be novel serum biomarkers for evaluating the progression of nephropathy and its cardiovascular risk in type 2 diabetic patients. © 2009 by the American Diabetes Association.
 
ISSN0149-5992
2013 Impact Factor: 8.570
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc08-1333
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000262188000029
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorYeung, DCY
 
dc.contributor.authorXu, A
 
dc.contributor.authorTso, AWK
 
dc.contributor.authorChow, WS
 
dc.contributor.authorWat, NMS
 
dc.contributor.authorFong, CHY
 
dc.contributor.authorTam, S
 
dc.contributor.authorSham, PC
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSL
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-31T03:47:58Z
 
dc.date.available2010-05-31T03:47:58Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE - To investigate the relationships of serum adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (A-FABP) and epidermal fatty acid-binding protein (E-FABP) with renal dysfunction and macrovascular complications in type 2 diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS- The associations of serum A-FABP and E-FABP with markers of renal function, nephropathy staging, and macrovascular complications were examined in 237 type 2 diabetic patients. RESULTS - Serum A-FABP and E-FABP correlated significantly with serum creatinine, mean albumin excretion rate, and glomerular filtration rate (all P < 0.001) and were independently associated with diabetic nephropathy staging (P = 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Circulating levels of both types of FABP were increased (P < 0.01) in subjects with macrovascular complications. Serum A-FABP was independently associated with macrovascular complications (odds ratio 2.92 [95% CI 1.42-6.01]; P = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS - Serum A-FABP and E-FABP might be novel serum biomarkers for evaluating the progression of nephropathy and its cardiovascular risk in type 2 diabetic patients. © 2009 by the American Diabetes Association.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationDiabetes Care, 2009, v. 32 n. 1, p. 132-134 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc08-1333
 
dc.identifier.citeulike3824291
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc08-1333
 
dc.identifier.epage134
 
dc.identifier.hkuros154217
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000262188000029
 
dc.identifier.issn0149-5992
2013 Impact Factor: 8.570
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid18931100
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-64549103470
 
dc.identifier.spage132
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/59337
 
dc.identifier.volume32
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAmerican Diabetes Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofDiabetes Care
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.titleCirculating levels of adipocyte and epidermal fatty acid-binding proteins in relation to nephropathy staging and macrovascular complications in type 2 diabetic patients
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Yeung, DCY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Xu, A</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tso, AWK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chow, WS</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wat, NMS</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Fong, CHY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tam, S</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Sham, PC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lam, KSL</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2010-05-31T03:47:58Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2010-05-31T03:47:58Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2009</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Diabetes Care, 2009, v. 32 n. 1, p. 132-134</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>0149-5992</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/59337</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>OBJECTIVE - To investigate the relationships of serum adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (A-FABP) and epidermal fatty acid-binding protein (E-FABP) with renal dysfunction and macrovascular complications in type 2 diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS- The associations of serum A-FABP and E-FABP with markers of renal function, nephropathy staging, and macrovascular complications were examined in 237 type 2 diabetic patients. RESULTS - Serum A-FABP and E-FABP correlated significantly with serum creatinine, mean albumin excretion rate, and glomerular filtration rate (all P &lt; 0.001) and were independently associated with diabetic nephropathy staging (P = 0.001 and P &lt; 0.05, respectively). Circulating levels of both types of FABP were increased (P &lt; 0.01) in subjects with macrovascular complications. Serum A-FABP was independently associated with macrovascular complications (odds ratio 2.92 [95% CI 1.42-6.01]; P = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS - Serum A-FABP and E-FABP might be novel serum biomarkers for evaluating the progression of nephropathy and its cardiovascular risk in type 2 diabetic patients. &#169; 2009 by the American Diabetes Association.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>American Diabetes Association. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>Diabetes Care</relation.ispartof>
<title>Circulating levels of adipocyte and epidermal fatty acid-binding proteins in relation to nephropathy staging and macrovascular complications in type 2 diabetic patients</title>
<type>Article</type>
<identifier.openurl>http://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&amp;issn=0149-5992&amp;volume=32&amp;spage=132&amp;epage=4&amp;date=2009&amp;atitle=Circulating+levels+of+adipocyte+and+epidermal+fatty+acid-binding+proteins+in+relation+to+nephropathy+staging+and+macrovascular+complications+in+type+2+diabetic+patients</identifier.openurl>
<description.nature>link_to_subscribed_fulltext</description.nature>
<identifier.doi>10.2337/dc08-1333</identifier.doi>
<identifier.pmid>18931100</identifier.pmid>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-64549103470</identifier.scopus>
<identifier.hkuros>154217</identifier.hkuros>
<relation.references>http://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-64549103470&amp;selection=ref&amp;src=s&amp;origin=recordpage</relation.references>
<identifier.volume>32</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>1</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>132</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>134</identifier.epage>
<identifier.isi>WOS:000262188000029</identifier.isi>
<publisher.place>United States</publisher.place>
<identifier.citeulike>3824291</identifier.citeulike>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong