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Article: Doctors' personal health care choices: A cross-sectional survey in a mixed public/private setting
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TitleDoctors' personal health care choices: A cross-sectional survey in a mixed public/private setting
 
AuthorsChen, JY1
Tse, EYY1
Lam, TP1
Li, DKT1
Chao, DVK1 2
Kwan, CW1
 
Issue Date2008
 
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/
 
CitationBMC Public Health, 2008, v. 8, article no. 183 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-8-183
 
AbstractBackground. Among Western countries, it has been found that physicians tend to manage their own illnesses and tend not have their own independent family physicians. This is recognized as a significant issue for both physicians and, by extension, the patients under their care, resulting in initiatives seeking to address this. Physicians' personal health care practices in Asia have yet to be documented. Methods. An anonymous cross-sectional postal questionnaire survey was conducted in Hong Kong, China. All 9570 medical practitioners in Hong Kong registered with the Hong Kong Medical Council in 2003 were surveyed. Chi-square tests and logistic regression models were applied. Results. There were 4198 respondents to the survey; a response rate of 44%. Two-thirds of respondents took care of themselves when they were last ill, with 62% of these self-medicating with prescription medication. Physicians who were graduates of Hong Kong medical schools, those working in general practice and non-members of the Hong Kong College of Family Physicians were more likely to do so. Physician specialty was found to be the most influential reason in the choice of caregiver by those who had ever consulted another medical practitioner. Only 14% chose consultation with a FM/GP with younger physians and non-Hong Kong medical graduates having a higher likelihood of doing so. Seventy percent of all respondents believed that having their own personal physician was unnecessary. Conclusion. Similar to the practice of colleagues in other countries, a large proportion of Hong Kong physicians self-manage their illnesses, take self-obtained prescription drugs and believe they do not need a personal physician. Future strategies to benefit the medical care of Hong Kong physicians will have to take these practices and beliefs into consideration. © 2008 Chen et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
 
ISSN1471-2458
2013 Impact Factor: 2.321
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.233
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-8-183
 
PubMed Central IDPMC2429910
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000257164400001
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChen, JY
 
dc.contributor.authorTse, EYY
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, TP
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, DKT
 
dc.contributor.authorChao, DVK
 
dc.contributor.authorKwan, CW
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-12T01:38:54Z
 
dc.date.available2010-04-12T01:38:54Z
 
dc.date.issued2008
 
dc.description.abstractBackground. Among Western countries, it has been found that physicians tend to manage their own illnesses and tend not have their own independent family physicians. This is recognized as a significant issue for both physicians and, by extension, the patients under their care, resulting in initiatives seeking to address this. Physicians' personal health care practices in Asia have yet to be documented. Methods. An anonymous cross-sectional postal questionnaire survey was conducted in Hong Kong, China. All 9570 medical practitioners in Hong Kong registered with the Hong Kong Medical Council in 2003 were surveyed. Chi-square tests and logistic regression models were applied. Results. There were 4198 respondents to the survey; a response rate of 44%. Two-thirds of respondents took care of themselves when they were last ill, with 62% of these self-medicating with prescription medication. Physicians who were graduates of Hong Kong medical schools, those working in general practice and non-members of the Hong Kong College of Family Physicians were more likely to do so. Physician specialty was found to be the most influential reason in the choice of caregiver by those who had ever consulted another medical practitioner. Only 14% chose consultation with a FM/GP with younger physians and non-Hong Kong medical graduates having a higher likelihood of doing so. Seventy percent of all respondents believed that having their own personal physician was unnecessary. Conclusion. Similar to the practice of colleagues in other countries, a large proportion of Hong Kong physicians self-manage their illnesses, take self-obtained prescription drugs and believe they do not need a personal physician. Future strategies to benefit the medical care of Hong Kong physicians will have to take these practices and beliefs into consideration. © 2008 Chen et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.identifier.citationBMC Public Health, 2008, v. 8, article no. 183 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-8-183
 
dc.identifier.citeulike2845646
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-8-183
 
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2458
 
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 183
 
dc.identifier.hkuros143107
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000257164400001
 
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458
2013 Impact Factor: 2.321
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.233
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2429910
 
dc.identifier.pmid18505593
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-45249106852
 
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 183
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57514
 
dc.identifier.volume8
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Public Health
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.rightsB M C Public Health. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.
 
dc.subject.meshHealth Behavior
 
dc.subject.meshPhysicians - psychology
 
dc.subject.meshSelf Care - utilization
 
dc.subject.meshSpecialties, Medical - statistics & numerical data
 
dc.subject.meshChoice Behavior
 
dc.titleDoctors' personal health care choices: A cross-sectional survey in a mixed public/private setting
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. United Christian Hospital Hong Kong