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Article: Barriers and facilitators to human papillomavirus vaccination among Chinese adolescent girls in Hong Kong: A qualitative-quantitative study

TitleBarriers and facilitators to human papillomavirus vaccination among Chinese adolescent girls in Hong Kong: A qualitative-quantitative study
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://sti.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Sexually Transmitted Infections, 2008, v. 84 n. 3, p. 227-232 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To explore perceptions towards cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV vaccination and to identify factors affecting the acceptability of HPV vaccination among Chinese adolescent girls in Hong Kong. Methods: Six focus groups were conducted with Chinese adolescent girls (median age 16 years, age range 13-20, n = 64) in Hong Kong in April 2007. Thematic analysis was employed to identify major themes related to cervical cancer and HPV vaccination. A supplementary questionnaire was administered to all participants before and after group discussion to assess their knowledge, attitudes and intention to be vaccinated and to collect demographic information. Results: Participants' knowledge on cervical cancer was limited and HPV was largely unheard of. They had difficulty understanding the mechanism linking cervical cancer with HPV infection. Participants held a favourable attitude towards HPV vaccination but the perceived timing of vaccination varied. Barriers to vaccination include high monetary cost, uncertain length of vaccine effectiveness, low perceived risk of HPV infection, no immediate perceived need of vaccination, anticipated family disapproval and fear of the pain of injection. Factors conducive to vaccination include perceived family and peer support and medical reassurance on safety and efficacy of vaccine. The differences on knowledge, attitudes, intention to be vaccinated now and willingness to conform to significant others before and after the discussion were statistically significant, with an increased tendency towards favouring vaccination after the focus group. Conclusions: Participants favoured HPV vaccination despite not feeling an immediate need to be vaccinated. Interventions could focus on providing professional information on HPV vaccination and raising adolescents' perceived need to take preventive measures against HPV infection.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57408
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.015
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.142
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwan, TTCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KKLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, AMWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTam, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, ANYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYoung, PMCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, PWHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNgan, HYSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-12T01:35:43Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-12T01:35:43Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSexually Transmitted Infections, 2008, v. 84 n. 3, p. 227-232en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1368-4973en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/57408-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To explore perceptions towards cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV vaccination and to identify factors affecting the acceptability of HPV vaccination among Chinese adolescent girls in Hong Kong. Methods: Six focus groups were conducted with Chinese adolescent girls (median age 16 years, age range 13-20, n = 64) in Hong Kong in April 2007. Thematic analysis was employed to identify major themes related to cervical cancer and HPV vaccination. A supplementary questionnaire was administered to all participants before and after group discussion to assess their knowledge, attitudes and intention to be vaccinated and to collect demographic information. Results: Participants' knowledge on cervical cancer was limited and HPV was largely unheard of. They had difficulty understanding the mechanism linking cervical cancer with HPV infection. Participants held a favourable attitude towards HPV vaccination but the perceived timing of vaccination varied. Barriers to vaccination include high monetary cost, uncertain length of vaccine effectiveness, low perceived risk of HPV infection, no immediate perceived need of vaccination, anticipated family disapproval and fear of the pain of injection. Factors conducive to vaccination include perceived family and peer support and medical reassurance on safety and efficacy of vaccine. The differences on knowledge, attitudes, intention to be vaccinated now and willingness to conform to significant others before and after the discussion were statistically significant, with an increased tendency towards favouring vaccination after the focus group. Conclusions: Participants favoured HPV vaccination despite not feeling an immediate need to be vaccinated. Interventions could focus on providing professional information on HPV vaccination and raising adolescents' perceived need to take preventive measures against HPV infection.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://sti.bmjjournals.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSexually Transmitted Infectionsen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsSexually Transmitted Infections. Copyright © BMJ Publishing Group.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPapillomavirus Infections - ethnology - prevention & controlen_HK
dc.subject.meshPapillomavirus Vaccinesen_HK
dc.subject.meshPatient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshUterine Cervical Neoplasms - psychologyen_HK
dc.titleBarriers and facilitators to human papillomavirus vaccination among Chinese adolescent girls in Hong Kong: A qualitative-quantitative studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1368-4973&volume=84&issue=3&spage=227&epage=232&date=2008&atitle=Barriers+and+facilitators+to+human+papillomavirus+vaccination+among+Chinese+adolescent+girls+in+Hong+Kong:+a+qualitative–quantitative+studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, KKL:kklchan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, ANY:anycheun@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailNgan, HYS:hysngan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KKL=rp00499en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, ANY=rp00542en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNgan, HYS=rp00346en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/sti.2007.029363en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18256106en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-45549085573en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros212284-
dc.identifier.hkuros145303-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-45549085573&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume84en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage227en_HK
dc.identifier.epage232en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000256206600020-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwan, TTC=16063821800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KKL=8655666700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, AMW=19838748300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, KF=7201692816en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, ANY=54927484100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYoung, PMC=20437115500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, PWH=7406120357en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNgan, HYS=34571944100en_HK

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