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Article: Metabolic syndrome increases all-cause and vascular mortality: The Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Study

TitleMetabolic syndrome increases all-cause and vascular mortality: The Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Study
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664
Citation
Clinical Endocrinology, 2007, v. 66 n. 5, p. 666-671 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: The metabolic syndrome has been associated with increased mortality in some Caucasian populations, but data in Asian populations are not available. We present data describing the association of the metabolic syndrome with mortality. Methods: The impact of the US National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) metabolic syndrome guidelines definition (using Asian central obesity criteria) on mortality was examined using Cox regression analyses in a population-based cohort (n = 2863) of Chinese subjects. Results: The cohort was followed up for a mean duration of 8.45 years, a total of 24 101 person-years, with 89 deaths (33.7% of vascular origin). Compared to those without any component of the metabolic syndrome, following adjustment for age, socioeconomic status and a range of lifestyle habits, those with the metabolic syndrome had increased risk of both all-cause [hazard ratio (HR) 2.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-4.00, P for trend = 0.037] and vascular disease (HR 6.39, 95% CI 1.40-29.2, P < 0.05, P for trend = 0.002) mortality. When those with 0-2 components were compared to those with the metabolic syndrome, the HRs were 1.49 (95% CI 0.95-2.33, P = 0.084) and 3.36 (95% CI 1.57-7.19, P = 0.002), respectively. Conclusion: This study shows that the metabolic syndrome is associated with increased mortality risk in an Asian population. The high prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, particularly in the elderly, forewarns of a rapidly increasing problem in mainland China, and other Asian populations, which could have overwhelming public health ramifications. © 2007 The Authors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/54273
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.487
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.314
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcGhee, SMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWat, NMSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJanus, EDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Prevalence Study Steering Committee-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-03T07:41:48Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-03T07:41:48Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Endocrinology, 2007, v. 66 n. 5, p. 666-671en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0300-0664en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/54273-
dc.description.abstractObjective: The metabolic syndrome has been associated with increased mortality in some Caucasian populations, but data in Asian populations are not available. We present data describing the association of the metabolic syndrome with mortality. Methods: The impact of the US National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) metabolic syndrome guidelines definition (using Asian central obesity criteria) on mortality was examined using Cox regression analyses in a population-based cohort (n = 2863) of Chinese subjects. Results: The cohort was followed up for a mean duration of 8.45 years, a total of 24 101 person-years, with 89 deaths (33.7% of vascular origin). Compared to those without any component of the metabolic syndrome, following adjustment for age, socioeconomic status and a range of lifestyle habits, those with the metabolic syndrome had increased risk of both all-cause [hazard ratio (HR) 2.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-4.00, P for trend = 0.037] and vascular disease (HR 6.39, 95% CI 1.40-29.2, P < 0.05, P for trend = 0.002) mortality. When those with 0-2 components were compared to those with the metabolic syndrome, the HRs were 1.49 (95% CI 0.95-2.33, P = 0.084) and 3.36 (95% CI 1.57-7.19, P = 0.002), respectively. Conclusion: This study shows that the metabolic syndrome is associated with increased mortality risk in an Asian population. The high prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, particularly in the elderly, forewarns of a rapidly increasing problem in mainland China, and other Asian populations, which could have overwhelming public health ramifications. © 2007 The Authors.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Endocrinologyen_HK
dc.rightsClinical Endocrinology. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.comen_HK
dc.subject.meshMetabolic Syndrome X - complications - epidemiology - mortalityen_HK
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_HK
dc.subject.meshProportional Hazards Modelsen_HK
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshVascular Diseases - etiology - mortalityen_HK
dc.titleMetabolic syndrome increases all-cause and vascular mortality: The Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0300-0664&volume=66&issue=5&spage=666&epage=671&date=2007&atitle=Metabolic+syndrome+increases+all-cause+and+vascular+mortality:+The+Hong+Kong+cardiovascular+risk+factor+studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM:cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcGhee, SM:smmcghee@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SY:syho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BMY:mycheung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL:ksllam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcGhee, SM=rp00393en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SY=rp00427en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BMY=rp01321en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprinten_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2265.2007.02798.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17381490-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34247863736en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros127248-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34247863736&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume66en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage666en_HK
dc.identifier.epage671en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000246199100010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, GN=35465269900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcGhee, SM=7003288588en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SY=7403716884en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, BMY=7103294806en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWat, NMS=6602131754en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJanus, ED=7006936536en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KSL=8082870600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike1287155-

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