File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The US National Cholesterol Education Programme Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in a Chinese population

TitleThe US National Cholesterol Education Programme Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in a Chinese population
Authors
KeywordsBlood pressure
Cardiovascular disease
Chinese
Cholesterol
Dyslipidaemia
Guidelines
Hypertension
Metabolic syndrome
Obesity
Type 2 diabetes mellitus
Issue Date2005
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/diabres
Citation
Diabetes Research And Clinical Practice, 2005, v. 67 n. 3, p. 251-257 How to Cite?
AbstractTo assess the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome disease cluster in the Hong Kong Chinese population we applied the US National Cholesterol Education Programme Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) guidelines. This was present if ≥3 of the following conditions were present: Hypertension (≥130/85 mmHg); fasting plasma glucose was ≥6.1 mmol/L; fasting plasma triglycerides ≥1.69 mmol/L; fasting HDL-cholesterol <1.04 or <1.29 mmol in males and females, respectively; or subjects were receiving treatment for their condition; waist circumference >88 or 102 cm (Asian WHO criteria ≥80 or 90 cm) in females and males, respectively. A total of 16.7% (17.1 (95%CI 15.7-18.5)% age and gender-adjusted) of the 2893 subjects had the metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of having at least 2, 3, 4 or 5 components was 34.5, 16.7, 6.4 and 1.4%, respectively. The prevalence increased from 3.1% in those aged 25-29 years to 41.0% in those aged over 70 years. Using the 2001 Census, 880,499 Hong Kong residents would have the metabolic syndrome. If the WHO recommended waist circumference for Asians is used, the age and gender-adjusted prevalence is significantly higher at 21.2% (21.9 (95%CI 20.4-23.4)%). In summary, the high prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in adult Hong Kong Chinese, particularly in the elderly, forewarns a rapidly increasing problem in Mainland China, and other Asian populations, which may have overwhelming public health ramifications. © 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48557
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.045
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.338
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJanus, EDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Prevalence Study Steering Committee-
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-22T04:17:05Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-22T04:17:05Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationDiabetes Research And Clinical Practice, 2005, v. 67 n. 3, p. 251-257en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0168-8227en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48557-
dc.description.abstractTo assess the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome disease cluster in the Hong Kong Chinese population we applied the US National Cholesterol Education Programme Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) guidelines. This was present if ≥3 of the following conditions were present: Hypertension (≥130/85 mmHg); fasting plasma glucose was ≥6.1 mmol/L; fasting plasma triglycerides ≥1.69 mmol/L; fasting HDL-cholesterol <1.04 or <1.29 mmol in males and females, respectively; or subjects were receiving treatment for their condition; waist circumference >88 or 102 cm (Asian WHO criteria ≥80 or 90 cm) in females and males, respectively. A total of 16.7% (17.1 (95%CI 15.7-18.5)% age and gender-adjusted) of the 2893 subjects had the metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of having at least 2, 3, 4 or 5 components was 34.5, 16.7, 6.4 and 1.4%, respectively. The prevalence increased from 3.1% in those aged 25-29 years to 41.0% in those aged over 70 years. Using the 2001 Census, 880,499 Hong Kong residents would have the metabolic syndrome. If the WHO recommended waist circumference for Asians is used, the age and gender-adjusted prevalence is significantly higher at 21.2% (21.9 (95%CI 20.4-23.4)%). In summary, the high prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in adult Hong Kong Chinese, particularly in the elderly, forewarns a rapidly increasing problem in Mainland China, and other Asian populations, which may have overwhelming public health ramifications. © 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.format.extent54914 bytes-
dc.format.extent2502 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/diabresen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofDiabetes Research and Clinical Practiceen_HK
dc.rightsDiabetes Research and Clinical Practice. Copyright © Elsevier Ireland Ltd.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectBlood pressureen_HK
dc.subjectCardiovascular diseaseen_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectCholesterolen_HK
dc.subjectDyslipidaemiaen_HK
dc.subjectGuidelinesen_HK
dc.subjectHypertensionen_HK
dc.subjectMetabolic syndromeen_HK
dc.subjectObesityen_HK
dc.subjectType 2 diabetes mellitusen_HK
dc.titleThe US National Cholesterol Education Programme Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in a Chinese populationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0168-8227&volume=67&issue=3&spage=251&epage=257&date=2005&atitle=The+US+National+Cholesterol+Education+Programme+Adult+Treatment+Panel+III+(NCEP+ATP+III)+prevalence+of+the+metabolic+syndrome+in+a+Chinese+populationen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SY:syho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL:ksllam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ:hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SY=rp00427en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprinten_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.diabres.2004.07.022en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15713358-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-13844252097en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros97329-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-13844252097&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume67en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage251en_HK
dc.identifier.epage257en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000227425700009-
dc.publisher.placeIrelanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, GN=35465269900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SY=7403716884en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJanus, ED=7006936536en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KSL=8082870600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats