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Article: The effect of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) on health service utilisation of a Chinese population
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TitleThe effect of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) on health service utilisation of a Chinese population
 
AuthorsLam, CLK1
Fong, DYT1
Lauder, IJ1
Lam, TPD1
 
KeywordsChinese
Consultation rates
Hong Kong
Quality of life
Service utilisation
SF-36
 
Issue Date2002
 
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/socscimed
 
CitationSocial Science And Medicine, 2002, v. 55 n. 9, p. 1635-1646 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0277-9536(01)00296-9
 
AbstractThis study was designed to find out whether health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was an independent determinant of health service utilisation of a Chinese population and to determine whether the addition of HRQOL data to sociodemographic and morbidity factors could significantly increase the explanatory power of risk-adjustment models. A cross-sectional random telephone survey of the general adult Chinese population in Hong Kong was conducted among 2410 Chinese aged 18-88yr old, 52% were females and 38% had one or more chronic diseases. Health service utilisation was measured by annual consultation, monthly consultation and hospitalisation rates. HRQOL was measured by the SF-36. Multivariate regressions were used to test the dependence of service utilisation rates on sociodemographic factors, chronic morbidity and the SF-36 scores. Structured multiphase regression analyses were used to determine the magnitude of the effect of the SF-36 scores, in addition to those of sociodemographic and chronic morbidity factors, on service utilisation. Five of eight SF-36 scores were independent determinants of consultation rates. They doubled and tripled the percentages of variance explained for annual and monthly consultation rates, respectively. Role limitation by physical problems and bodily pain scores had a significant effect on hospitalisation rates. This was the first study showing a linear relationship between HRQOL and service utilisation on a Chinese population. It confirmed the clinical relevance of the SF-36 to a culture and health care system that is different from that of the United States where the instrument originated. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0277-9536
2012 Impact Factor: 2.733
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.513
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0277-9536(01)00296-9
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000178838600012
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLam, CLK
 
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYT
 
dc.contributor.authorLauder, IJ
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, TPD
 
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-22T04:15:03Z
 
dc.date.available2008-05-22T04:15:03Z
 
dc.date.issued2002
 
dc.description.abstractThis study was designed to find out whether health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was an independent determinant of health service utilisation of a Chinese population and to determine whether the addition of HRQOL data to sociodemographic and morbidity factors could significantly increase the explanatory power of risk-adjustment models. A cross-sectional random telephone survey of the general adult Chinese population in Hong Kong was conducted among 2410 Chinese aged 18-88yr old, 52% were females and 38% had one or more chronic diseases. Health service utilisation was measured by annual consultation, monthly consultation and hospitalisation rates. HRQOL was measured by the SF-36. Multivariate regressions were used to test the dependence of service utilisation rates on sociodemographic factors, chronic morbidity and the SF-36 scores. Structured multiphase regression analyses were used to determine the magnitude of the effect of the SF-36 scores, in addition to those of sociodemographic and chronic morbidity factors, on service utilisation. Five of eight SF-36 scores were independent determinants of consultation rates. They doubled and tripled the percentages of variance explained for annual and monthly consultation rates, respectively. Role limitation by physical problems and bodily pain scores had a significant effect on hospitalisation rates. This was the first study showing a linear relationship between HRQOL and service utilisation on a Chinese population. It confirmed the clinical relevance of the SF-36 to a culture and health care system that is different from that of the United States where the instrument originated. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.naturepostprint
 
dc.format.extent120366 bytes
 
dc.format.extent241905 bytes
 
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
 
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
 
dc.identifier.citationSocial Science And Medicine, 2002, v. 55 n. 9, p. 1635-1646 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0277-9536(01)00296-9
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0277-9536(01)00296-9
 
dc.identifier.epage1646
 
dc.identifier.hkuros75580
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000178838600012
 
dc.identifier.issn0277-9536
2012 Impact Factor: 2.733
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.513
 
dc.identifier.issue9
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid12297248
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036842124
 
dc.identifier.spage1635
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/48493
 
dc.identifier.volume55
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/socscimed
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Science and Medicine
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subjectChinese
 
dc.subjectConsultation rates
 
dc.subjectHong Kong
 
dc.subjectQuality of life
 
dc.subjectService utilisation
 
dc.subjectSF-36
 
dc.titleThe effect of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) on health service utilisation of a Chinese population
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong