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Article: Inhaled steroids and bone metabolism in clinical perspective

TitleInhaled steroids and bone metabolism in clinical perspective
Authors
Keywordsbone metabolism
inhaled corticosteroids
Issue Date1995
PublisherHong Kong Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/resources/supp.html
Citation
Hong Kong Medical Journal, 1995, v. 1 n. 1, p. 48-52 How to Cite?
AbstractInhaled corticosteroids have become the mainstay of maintenance treatment in asthma adults, and they are also being advocated for early use in children. The systemic side effects of inhaled steroids are much less than those from systemic steroids needed for comparable asthma control. Long term use of systemic corticosteroids is known to cause osteoporosis, and the risks from inhaled therapy are currently under study. There are reports of changes in biochemical parameters of bone metabolism due to inhaled corticosteroids, suggesting depression of bone formation and increase in bone resorption. However, the significance of biochemical changes in relation to bone mass and architecture is not known. Cross-sectional studies of bone mass suggest that dosages of more than 1 mg daily in adults may be associated with a decrease in bone mineral density. Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the findings and define more clearly the profile and risk factors of bone loss. Current data in children show that inhaled corticosteroid in the usual therapeutic dose range has no detrimental effect on long term statural growth, while effects of peak bone mass are not yet known. The magnitude of measurable adverse effects were found to be dose-dependent, hence, the use of a minimum effective dose is recommended. Patients on inhaled corticosteroid therapy should maintain optimal intake of calcium and vitamin D. Physical activity should be encouraged and oestrogen replacement therapy in postmenopausal women considered.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/45081
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.887
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.279

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorIp, MSMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-30T06:17:01Z-
dc.date.available2007-10-30T06:17:01Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Medical Journal, 1995, v. 1 n. 1, p. 48-52en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1024-2708en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/45081-
dc.description.abstractInhaled corticosteroids have become the mainstay of maintenance treatment in asthma adults, and they are also being advocated for early use in children. The systemic side effects of inhaled steroids are much less than those from systemic steroids needed for comparable asthma control. Long term use of systemic corticosteroids is known to cause osteoporosis, and the risks from inhaled therapy are currently under study. There are reports of changes in biochemical parameters of bone metabolism due to inhaled corticosteroids, suggesting depression of bone formation and increase in bone resorption. However, the significance of biochemical changes in relation to bone mass and architecture is not known. Cross-sectional studies of bone mass suggest that dosages of more than 1 mg daily in adults may be associated with a decrease in bone mineral density. Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the findings and define more clearly the profile and risk factors of bone loss. Current data in children show that inhaled corticosteroid in the usual therapeutic dose range has no detrimental effect on long term statural growth, while effects of peak bone mass are not yet known. The magnitude of measurable adverse effects were found to be dose-dependent, hence, the use of a minimum effective dose is recommended. Patients on inhaled corticosteroid therapy should maintain optimal intake of calcium and vitamin D. Physical activity should be encouraged and oestrogen replacement therapy in postmenopausal women considered.en_HK
dc.format.extent381326 bytes-
dc.format.extent4677 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHong Kong Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/resources/supp.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Medical Journalen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectbone metabolismen_HK
dc.subjectinhaled corticosteroidsen_HK
dc.titleInhaled steroids and bone metabolism in clinical perspectiveen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1024-2708&volume=1&issue=1&spage=48&epage=52&date=1995&atitle=Inhaled+steroids+and+bone+metabolism+in+clinical+perspectiveen_HK
dc.identifier.emailIp, MSM:msmip@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL:ksllam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityIp, MSM=rp00347en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029616080en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros4753-
dc.identifier.volume1en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage48en_HK
dc.identifier.epage52en_HK
dc.publisher.placeHong Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIp, MSM=7102423259en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, KSL=8082870600en_HK

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