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Article: Association of Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Frequency with Adiposity: Evidence from the 'Children of 1997' Birth Cohort

TitleAssociation of Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Frequency with Adiposity: Evidence from the 'Children of 1997' Birth Cohort
Authors
Keywordsadiposity
children
sugar-sweetened beverages
Issue Date2020
PublisherMDPI AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mdpi.com/journal/nutrients/
Citation
Nutrients, 2020, v. 12, p. article no. 1015 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Observationally, sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption is associated with adiposity in Western children but could be confounded. We examined the association of SSB frequency with adiposity in the non-Western setting of Hong Kong. Methods: We examined the associations of SSB consumption frequency at 11 and 13 years assessed by using a food frequency questionnaire with subsequent body mass index (BMI) z-score and overweight/obesity up to 18 years using generalized estimating equations, and with waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, and body fat percentage at 16–19 years using linear regression in a population-representative Chinese birth cohort “Children of 1997” (n = 3628). Results: At 11 and 13 years, 6.8% and 8.2% of children respectively consumed SSB daily. Neither SSB frequency at 11 nor at 13 years was associated with subsequent BMI z-score or overweight/obesity up to 18 years, or with waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, or body fat percentage at 16–19 years adjusted for age, sex, socioeconomic position, health status, physical activity and other food consumption, although bias to the null from under-reporting cannot be eliminated. Conclusion: Although we cannot definitively exclude a small association of SSB frequency with adiposity, lack of association of SSB frequency with adiposity in a non-Western setting with low SSB consumption suggests that the role of SSB in adiposity appears to be minor.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/282470
ISSN
2018 Impact Factor: 4.171
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.275

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZHANG, T-
dc.contributor.authorAu Yeung, SLR-
dc.contributor.authorKwok, MK-
dc.contributor.authorHui, LL-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GM-
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CM-
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-15T05:28:32Z-
dc.date.available2020-05-15T05:28:32Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationNutrients, 2020, v. 12, p. article no. 1015-
dc.identifier.issn2072-6643-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/282470-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Observationally, sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption is associated with adiposity in Western children but could be confounded. We examined the association of SSB frequency with adiposity in the non-Western setting of Hong Kong. Methods: We examined the associations of SSB consumption frequency at 11 and 13 years assessed by using a food frequency questionnaire with subsequent body mass index (BMI) z-score and overweight/obesity up to 18 years using generalized estimating equations, and with waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, and body fat percentage at 16–19 years using linear regression in a population-representative Chinese birth cohort “Children of 1997” (n = 3628). Results: At 11 and 13 years, 6.8% and 8.2% of children respectively consumed SSB daily. Neither SSB frequency at 11 nor at 13 years was associated with subsequent BMI z-score or overweight/obesity up to 18 years, or with waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, or body fat percentage at 16–19 years adjusted for age, sex, socioeconomic position, health status, physical activity and other food consumption, although bias to the null from under-reporting cannot be eliminated. Conclusion: Although we cannot definitively exclude a small association of SSB frequency with adiposity, lack of association of SSB frequency with adiposity in a non-Western setting with low SSB consumption suggests that the role of SSB in adiposity appears to be minor.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherMDPI AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mdpi.com/journal/nutrients/-
dc.relation.ispartofNutrients-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectadiposity-
dc.subjectchildren-
dc.subjectsugar-sweetened beverages-
dc.titleAssociation of Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Frequency with Adiposity: Evidence from the 'Children of 1997' Birth Cohort-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailAu Yeung, SLR: ayslryan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailKwok, MK: maggiek@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityAu Yeung, SLR=rp02224-
dc.identifier.authorityKwok, MK=rp02051-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460-
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/nu12041015-
dc.identifier.pmid32272690-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85083257804-
dc.identifier.hkuros309899-
dc.identifier.volume12-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 1015-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 1015-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-

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