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Conference Paper: CORRELATES OF SELF-STIGMA IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH EARLY PSYCHOSIS IN HONG KONG

TitleCORRELATES OF SELF-STIGMA IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH EARLY PSYCHOSIS IN HONG KONG
Authors
Issue Date2019
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://schizophreniabulletin.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
2019 Congress of the Schizophrenia International Research Society (SIRS), Orlando, Florida, 10-14 April 2019. In Schizophrenia Bulletin, 2019, v. 45 n. Suppl. 2, p. S352-S352 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Self-stigma obstructs recovery from psychotic disorders yet factors contributing to self-stigma among these patients, especially those with early psychosis have been understudied. Accumulating evidence has also indicated that high self-stigma is already prevalent in the early course of illness. This study aimed to examine correlates of self-stigma in adult patients who had completed 3-year specialized early intervention service for first-episode psychosis (FEP) in Hong Kong. Methods: One hundred and one Chinese patients aged 26–55 years who completed 3-year specialized early intervention service for FEP in Hong Kong were recruited. Assessments encompassing illness onset, clinical, functional and self-stigma variables were conducted. Results: Univariate analyses showed that gender, educational level, age of onset, duration of untreated psychosis (DUP), higher scores on the Scale to Assess Unawareness of Mental Disorder (SUMD) and Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES) were related to self-stigma (measured by Self-Stigma Scale-Short form) (threshold set at p<0.1). Multiple linear regression analysis further revealed that female gender (p=0.03), older age at onset of psychosis (p=0.02), longer DUP (p=0.03), and better insight (measured by SUMD, p=0.04) were independently associated with higher levels of self-stigma in early psychosis patients. Discussion: Our results indicated that greater self-stigma is linked to female gender, older age of illness onset, treatment delay and better insight in the early stage of psychotic disorder. In particular, patients who have good insight and / or prolonged DUP may represent a vulnerable subgroup in early psychosis who requires more specific interventions to minimize risk of increased self-stigma. Further research is warranted to clarify longitudinal changes of self-stigma and the associated predictors to facilitate development of effective interventions.
DescriptionPoster Session III - no. S120
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/279538
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 7.958
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.051

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, CM-
dc.contributor.authorChang, WC-
dc.contributor.authorWong, CF-
dc.contributor.authorLau, FC-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, TT-
dc.contributor.authorChu, OKA-
dc.contributor.authorOr, CF-
dc.contributor.authorHo, C-
dc.contributor.authorHui, CLM-
dc.contributor.authorChan, KW-
dc.contributor.authorLee, HME-
dc.contributor.authorSuen, YN-
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYH-
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-01T07:19:15Z-
dc.date.available2019-11-01T07:19:15Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citation2019 Congress of the Schizophrenia International Research Society (SIRS), Orlando, Florida, 10-14 April 2019. In Schizophrenia Bulletin, 2019, v. 45 n. Suppl. 2, p. S352-S352-
dc.identifier.issn0586-7614-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/279538-
dc.descriptionPoster Session III - no. S120-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Self-stigma obstructs recovery from psychotic disorders yet factors contributing to self-stigma among these patients, especially those with early psychosis have been understudied. Accumulating evidence has also indicated that high self-stigma is already prevalent in the early course of illness. This study aimed to examine correlates of self-stigma in adult patients who had completed 3-year specialized early intervention service for first-episode psychosis (FEP) in Hong Kong. Methods: One hundred and one Chinese patients aged 26–55 years who completed 3-year specialized early intervention service for FEP in Hong Kong were recruited. Assessments encompassing illness onset, clinical, functional and self-stigma variables were conducted. Results: Univariate analyses showed that gender, educational level, age of onset, duration of untreated psychosis (DUP), higher scores on the Scale to Assess Unawareness of Mental Disorder (SUMD) and Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES) were related to self-stigma (measured by Self-Stigma Scale-Short form) (threshold set at p<0.1). Multiple linear regression analysis further revealed that female gender (p=0.03), older age at onset of psychosis (p=0.02), longer DUP (p=0.03), and better insight (measured by SUMD, p=0.04) were independently associated with higher levels of self-stigma in early psychosis patients. Discussion: Our results indicated that greater self-stigma is linked to female gender, older age of illness onset, treatment delay and better insight in the early stage of psychotic disorder. In particular, patients who have good insight and / or prolonged DUP may represent a vulnerable subgroup in early psychosis who requires more specific interventions to minimize risk of increased self-stigma. Further research is warranted to clarify longitudinal changes of self-stigma and the associated predictors to facilitate development of effective interventions.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://schizophreniabulletin.oxfordjournals.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofSchizophrenia Bulletin-
dc.relation.ispartof2019 Congress of the Schizophrenia International Research Society (SIRS)-
dc.titleCORRELATES OF SELF-STIGMA IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH EARLY PSYCHOSIS IN HONG KONG-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailNg, CM: maryncm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChang, WC: changwc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, CF: scfwong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLau, FC: fclau@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHo, C: drhodrho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHui, CLM: christyh@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, KW: kwsherry@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, HME: edwinlhm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSuen, YN: suenyn@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChang, WC=rp01465-
dc.identifier.authorityHui, CLM=rp01993-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KW=rp00539-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, HME=rp01575-
dc.identifier.authoritySuen, YN=rp02481-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/schbul/sbz020.665-
dc.identifier.hkuros308310-
dc.identifier.volume45-
dc.identifier.issueSuppl. 2-
dc.identifier.spageS352-
dc.identifier.epageS352-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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