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Article: Distinct profiles of cognitive impairment associated with different silent cerebrovascular lesions in hypertensive elderly Chinese

TitleDistinct profiles of cognitive impairment associated with different silent cerebrovascular lesions in hypertensive elderly Chinese
Authors
Issue Date2019
Citation
Journal of the Neurological Sciences, 2019, v. 403, p. 139-145 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground/objectives Silent cerebrovascular lesions (SCLs) and their underlying pathology are now recognized as important causes of cognitive impairment in the elderly. However, the distinct profile of cognitive deficits associated with each type of SCLs remains unclear. Methods Of 497 otherwise healthy hypertensive elderly Chinese, 398 participants (mean age 72.0, ranging from 65 to 99, SD = 5.1) successfully completed a battery of structured neuropsychological tests and a multi-sequence 3 T MRI scanning. SCLs were rated independently. Correlations between each MRI marker and cognitive function were assessed using a series of linear regression models. Results Strictly lobar cerebral microbleeds were linked to impaired language function (B = −0.231, p < 0.05). Silent lacunes were associated with poor executive function, but the association disappeared after additional adjustment for white matter hyperintensities. White matter hyperintensities (especially periventricular hyperintensities) were associated with poor executive function (B = −0.126, p < 0.05) and slower information processing speed (B = −0.149, p < 0.05). Conclusion Different SCLs were associated with different patterns of cognitive deficits, indicating that different SCLs may have distinct impacts on cognitive performance.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/273861

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, M-
dc.contributor.authorXie, B-
dc.contributor.authorGao, J-
dc.contributor.authorMak, HKF-
dc.contributor.authorKwong, A.S-
dc.contributor.authorChan, D.C-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, RTF-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-18T14:50:06Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-18T14:50:06Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the Neurological Sciences, 2019, v. 403, p. 139-145-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/273861-
dc.description.abstractBackground/objectives Silent cerebrovascular lesions (SCLs) and their underlying pathology are now recognized as important causes of cognitive impairment in the elderly. However, the distinct profile of cognitive deficits associated with each type of SCLs remains unclear. Methods Of 497 otherwise healthy hypertensive elderly Chinese, 398 participants (mean age 72.0, ranging from 65 to 99, SD = 5.1) successfully completed a battery of structured neuropsychological tests and a multi-sequence 3 T MRI scanning. SCLs were rated independently. Correlations between each MRI marker and cognitive function were assessed using a series of linear regression models. Results Strictly lobar cerebral microbleeds were linked to impaired language function (B = −0.231, p < 0.05). Silent lacunes were associated with poor executive function, but the association disappeared after additional adjustment for white matter hyperintensities. White matter hyperintensities (especially periventricular hyperintensities) were associated with poor executive function (B = −0.126, p < 0.05) and slower information processing speed (B = −0.149, p < 0.05). Conclusion Different SCLs were associated with different patterns of cognitive deficits, indicating that different SCLs may have distinct impacts on cognitive performance.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Neurological Sciences-
dc.titleDistinct profiles of cognitive impairment associated with different silent cerebrovascular lesions in hypertensive elderly Chinese-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailGao, J: galeng@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailMak, HKF: makkf@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, RTF: rtcheung@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityMak, HKF=rp00533-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, RTF=rp00434-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jns.2019.06.028-
dc.identifier.hkuros301775-
dc.identifier.volume403-
dc.identifier.spage139-
dc.identifier.epage145-

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