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Article: Low-Frequency HIIT Improves Body Composition and Aerobic Capacity in Overweight Men

TitleLow-Frequency HIIT Improves Body Composition and Aerobic Capacity in Overweight Men
Authors
Issue Date2019
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.acsm-msse.org
Citation
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 2019, Epub How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The relationship between the frequency of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and the resultant adaptations is largely unclear. Purpose: This study compared the effects of different frequencies of HIIT with those of moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) on body composition in overweight or obese adults. Methods: Fifty-six overweight or obese (BMI: 26.4±2.9) men aged between 18 and 30 years (age: 22.8±3.1) were randomly assigned to the following groups: no-intervention control (CON; n=14), MICT performed thrice weekly (MICT×3/wk; n=9), HIIT performed thrice weekly (HIIT×3/wk; n=14), HIIT performed twice weekly (HIIT×2/wk; n=10), and HIIT performed once weekly (HIIT×1/wk; n=9). Each HIIT session consisted of 12×1-min bouts at 90% heart rate reserve (HRR), interspersed with 11×1-min bouts at 70% HRR. Aerobic capacity, body composition, resting heart rate, vascular function, insulin resistance, and biomarkers of metabolic syndrome risk factor were examined at baseline, after 4 weeks and after 8 weeks of intervention. Results: Aerobic capacity and percent fat-free mass significantly increased in all exercise groups compared with those in the CON group (CON vs. all exercise groups: p<0.05), whereas body fat mass and systolic blood pressure significantly decreased after 8 weeks of intervention in all exercise groups compared with those in the CON group (CON vs. all exercise groups: p<0.05). Body fat mass significantly decreased after 4 weeks in all HIIT groups compared with those in the CON group (CON vs. all HIIT groups: p<0.05) but not in the MICT×3/wk group. Conclusion: These novel results demonstrated that performing HIIT once weekly, even with a lower weekly volume of exercise, improved cardiorespiratory fitness, body composition, and blood pressure in overweight/obese adults. Low-frequency HIIT might be a feasible and effective strategy for the prescription of an initial exercise program for inactive, overweight or obese young men.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/272679
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.291
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.007

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCHIN, E-
dc.contributor.authorYU, A-
dc.contributor.authorLai, C-
dc.contributor.authorFong, D-
dc.contributor.authorChan, D-
dc.contributor.authorWong, S-
dc.contributor.authorSun, F-
dc.contributor.authorNgai, H-
dc.contributor.authorYung, P-
dc.contributor.authorSiu, P-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-06T09:14:30Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-06T09:14:30Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 2019, Epub-
dc.identifier.issn0195-9131-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/272679-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The relationship between the frequency of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and the resultant adaptations is largely unclear. Purpose: This study compared the effects of different frequencies of HIIT with those of moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) on body composition in overweight or obese adults. Methods: Fifty-six overweight or obese (BMI: 26.4±2.9) men aged between 18 and 30 years (age: 22.8±3.1) were randomly assigned to the following groups: no-intervention control (CON; n=14), MICT performed thrice weekly (MICT×3/wk; n=9), HIIT performed thrice weekly (HIIT×3/wk; n=14), HIIT performed twice weekly (HIIT×2/wk; n=10), and HIIT performed once weekly (HIIT×1/wk; n=9). Each HIIT session consisted of 12×1-min bouts at 90% heart rate reserve (HRR), interspersed with 11×1-min bouts at 70% HRR. Aerobic capacity, body composition, resting heart rate, vascular function, insulin resistance, and biomarkers of metabolic syndrome risk factor were examined at baseline, after 4 weeks and after 8 weeks of intervention. Results: Aerobic capacity and percent fat-free mass significantly increased in all exercise groups compared with those in the CON group (CON vs. all exercise groups: p<0.05), whereas body fat mass and systolic blood pressure significantly decreased after 8 weeks of intervention in all exercise groups compared with those in the CON group (CON vs. all exercise groups: p<0.05). Body fat mass significantly decreased after 4 weeks in all HIIT groups compared with those in the CON group (CON vs. all HIIT groups: p<0.05) but not in the MICT×3/wk group. Conclusion: These novel results demonstrated that performing HIIT once weekly, even with a lower weekly volume of exercise, improved cardiorespiratory fitness, body composition, and blood pressure in overweight/obese adults. Low-frequency HIIT might be a feasible and effective strategy for the prescription of an initial exercise program for inactive, overweight or obese young men.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.acsm-msse.org-
dc.relation.ispartofMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise-
dc.rightsThis is a non-final version of an article published in final form in (provide complete journal citation)-
dc.titleLow-Frequency HIIT Improves Body Composition and Aerobic Capacity in Overweight Men-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailFong, D: dytfong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailNgai, H: heidi.ngai@hkuspace.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSiu, P: pmsiu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityFong, D=rp00253-
dc.identifier.authoritySiu, P=rp02292-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1249/MSS.0000000000002097-
dc.identifier.pmid31343521-
dc.identifier.hkuros300589-
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage1-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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