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Article: Systematic Review on Therapeutic Strategies to Minimize Corneal Stromal Scarring After Injury

TitleSystematic Review on Therapeutic Strategies to Minimize Corneal Stromal Scarring After Injury
Authors
Issue Date2019
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.claojournal.org/
Citation
Eye & Contact Lens, 2019 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To evaluate recent studies on available and experimental therapies in preventing or minimizing corneal stromal scarring after injury. Methods: We performed an Entrez PubMed literature search using keywords “cornea,” “scarring,” “haze,” “opacity,” “ulcer,” “treatments,” “therapies,” “treatment complications,” and “pathophysiology” resulting in 390 articles of which 12 were analyzed after filtering, based on English language and publication within 8 years, and curation for relevance by the authors. Results: The 12 articles selected included four randomized control trials (RCTs) (two were double-blinded placebo-controlled RCTs, one was a prospective partially masked RCT, and one was an open-label RCT), two retrospective observational studies, and six laboratory-based studies including two studies having in vivo and in vitro experiments, one was in vivo study, one was ex vivo study, and the last two were in vitro studies. The current mainstay for preventing or minimizing corneal scarring involves the use of topical corticosteroids and local application of mitomycin C. However, supportive evidence for their use in clinical practice from well-designed RCTs is lacking. Laboratory studies on topical rosiglitazone therapy, vitamin C prophylaxis, gene therapy, and stem cell therapy have shown promising results but have yet to be translated to clinical research. Conclusion: There is a need for more robust randomized controlled trials to support treatments using topical corticosteroids and mitomycin C. Furthermore, their clinical efficacy and safety profile should be compared with new treatments that have shown promising results in the laboratory setting. Ultimately, the goal should be to personalize cornea scarring treatment according to the most effective treatment for the specific underlying pathology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/267363
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 1.813
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.580

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwok, SS-
dc.contributor.authorShih, KC-
dc.contributor.authorBU, Y-
dc.contributor.authorLo, ACY-
dc.contributor.authorChan, TCY-
dc.contributor.authorLai, JSM-
dc.contributor.authorJhanji, V-
dc.contributor.authorTong, L-
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-18T09:00:29Z-
dc.date.available2019-02-18T09:00:29Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationEye & Contact Lens, 2019-
dc.identifier.issn1542-2321-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/267363-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To evaluate recent studies on available and experimental therapies in preventing or minimizing corneal stromal scarring after injury. Methods: We performed an Entrez PubMed literature search using keywords “cornea,” “scarring,” “haze,” “opacity,” “ulcer,” “treatments,” “therapies,” “treatment complications,” and “pathophysiology” resulting in 390 articles of which 12 were analyzed after filtering, based on English language and publication within 8 years, and curation for relevance by the authors. Results: The 12 articles selected included four randomized control trials (RCTs) (two were double-blinded placebo-controlled RCTs, one was a prospective partially masked RCT, and one was an open-label RCT), two retrospective observational studies, and six laboratory-based studies including two studies having in vivo and in vitro experiments, one was in vivo study, one was ex vivo study, and the last two were in vitro studies. The current mainstay for preventing or minimizing corneal scarring involves the use of topical corticosteroids and local application of mitomycin C. However, supportive evidence for their use in clinical practice from well-designed RCTs is lacking. Laboratory studies on topical rosiglitazone therapy, vitamin C prophylaxis, gene therapy, and stem cell therapy have shown promising results but have yet to be translated to clinical research. Conclusion: There is a need for more robust randomized controlled trials to support treatments using topical corticosteroids and mitomycin C. Furthermore, their clinical efficacy and safety profile should be compared with new treatments that have shown promising results in the laboratory setting. Ultimately, the goal should be to personalize cornea scarring treatment according to the most effective treatment for the specific underlying pathology.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.claojournal.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofEye & Contact Lens-
dc.rightsThis is a non-final version of an article published in final form in (provide complete journal citation)-
dc.titleSystematic Review on Therapeutic Strategies to Minimize Corneal Stromal Scarring After Injury-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailShih, KC: kcshih@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLo, ACY: amylo@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLai, JSM: laism@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityShih, KC=rp01374-
dc.identifier.authorityLo, ACY=rp00425-
dc.identifier.authorityLai, JSM=rp00295-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/ICL.0000000000000584-
dc.identifier.hkuros296940-
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage1-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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