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Article: Nursing students' learning dynamics with clinical information and communication technology: A constructive grounded theory approach

TitleNursing students' learning dynamics with clinical information and communication technology: A constructive grounded theory approach
Authors
KeywordsClinical education
Clinical environment
Electronic medical record
Grounded theory
Information and communication technology
Learning dynamics
Nursing education
Qualitative research
Issue Date2019
PublisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/nedt
Citation
Nurse Education Today, 2019, v. 73, p. 41-47 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The learning of nursing students can be facilitated through direct and/or indirect experiences of using clinical information and communication technology during clinical placements. However, nursing students experience difficulties in using technology for learning. Despite the difficulties, nursing students’ learning dynamics with technology in real clinical contexts is poorly understood. Objectives: To develop a theoretical model by identifying nursing students’ learning dynamics with clinical information and communication technology and the factors influencing the dynamics. Design: A constructivist grounded theory approach was employed in order to develop the theoretical model. Settings: This research was conducted by recruiting nursing students from four universities in Seoul, South Korea. Participants: Sixteen fourth year nursing students were recruited by purposive sampling. Methods: This research collected qualitative interview data in up to four rounds of interviews using open-ended and semi-structured interview questions. A total of 23 interviews were conducted. The data were transcribed verbatim. All interview data were analysed using three coding methods; initial, focused, and theoretical coding. NVivo 11 was used for data management. Results: This research developed a theoretical model of nursing students’ learning dynamics with clinical information and communication technology. The model explains three dynamics that influence nursing students’ use of clinical information and communication technology (interpersonal, organisational and emotional dynamics) and the students’ responses regarding the dynamics for learning in clinical contexts. Conclusions: Nursing educators can use the theoretical model to understand how best to support nursing students in navigating their clinical environments to build competency in using clinical information and communication technology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/266054
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.067
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.958
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, JJJ-
dc.contributor.authorCarson, M-
dc.contributor.authorClarke, C-
dc.contributor.authorYang, SC-
dc.contributor.authorNam, S-
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-17T02:16:39Z-
dc.date.available2018-12-17T02:16:39Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationNurse Education Today, 2019, v. 73, p. 41-47-
dc.identifier.issn0260-6917-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/266054-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The learning of nursing students can be facilitated through direct and/or indirect experiences of using clinical information and communication technology during clinical placements. However, nursing students experience difficulties in using technology for learning. Despite the difficulties, nursing students’ learning dynamics with technology in real clinical contexts is poorly understood. Objectives: To develop a theoretical model by identifying nursing students’ learning dynamics with clinical information and communication technology and the factors influencing the dynamics. Design: A constructivist grounded theory approach was employed in order to develop the theoretical model. Settings: This research was conducted by recruiting nursing students from four universities in Seoul, South Korea. Participants: Sixteen fourth year nursing students were recruited by purposive sampling. Methods: This research collected qualitative interview data in up to four rounds of interviews using open-ended and semi-structured interview questions. A total of 23 interviews were conducted. The data were transcribed verbatim. All interview data were analysed using three coding methods; initial, focused, and theoretical coding. NVivo 11 was used for data management. Results: This research developed a theoretical model of nursing students’ learning dynamics with clinical information and communication technology. The model explains three dynamics that influence nursing students’ use of clinical information and communication technology (interpersonal, organisational and emotional dynamics) and the students’ responses regarding the dynamics for learning in clinical contexts. Conclusions: Nursing educators can use the theoretical model to understand how best to support nursing students in navigating their clinical environments to build competency in using clinical information and communication technology.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/nedt-
dc.relation.ispartofNurse Education Today-
dc.subjectClinical education-
dc.subjectClinical environment-
dc.subjectElectronic medical record-
dc.subjectGrounded theory-
dc.subjectInformation and communication technology-
dc.subjectLearning dynamics-
dc.subjectNursing education-
dc.subjectQualitative research-
dc.titleNursing students' learning dynamics with clinical information and communication technology: A constructive grounded theory approach-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLee, JJJ: leejay@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, JJJ=rp02239-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.nedt.2018.11.007-
dc.identifier.pmid30502593-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85057287964-
dc.identifier.hkuros296487-
dc.identifier.volume73-
dc.identifier.spage41-
dc.identifier.epage47-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000456904500008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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