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Article: Comparison of cognitive functions between first-episode schizophrenia patients, their unaffected siblings and individuals at clinical high-risk for psychosis

TitleComparison of cognitive functions between first-episode schizophrenia patients, their unaffected siblings and individuals at clinical high-risk for psychosis
Authors
KeywordsCognitive impairment
At-risk mental state
Genetic high-risk
Processing speed
First-episode psychosis
Issue Date2019
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM
Citation
Psychological Medicine, 2019, v. 49 n.11, p. 1929-1936 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Cognitive impairment is a core feature of schizophrenia and has been observed in both familial (FHR) and clinical high-risk (CHR) samples. Nonetheless, there is a paucity of research directly contrasting cognitive profiles in these two high-risk states and first-episode schizophrenia. This study aimed to compare cognitive functions in patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder (FES), their unaffected siblings (FHR), CHR individuals and healthy controls. Method: A standardized battery of cognitive assessments was administered to 69 FES patients, 71 help-seeking CHR individuals without family history of psychotic disorder, 50 FHR participants and 68 controls. FES and CHR participants were recruited from territory-wide early intervention service for psychosis in Hong Kong. CHR status was ascertained using Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental State. Results: Among four groups, FES patients displayed the largest global cognitive impairment and had medium-to-large deficits across all cognitive tests relative to controls. CHR and FHR participants significantly underperformed in most cognitive tests than controls. Among various cognitive tests, digit symbol coding demonstrated the greatest magnitude of impairment in FES and CHR groups compared with controls. No significant difference between two high-risk groups was observed in global cognition and all individual cognitive tests except digit symbol coding which showed greater deficits in CHR than in FHR participants. Conclusion: Clinical and familial risk groups experienced largely comparable cognitive impairment that was intermediate between FES and controls. Digit symbol coding may have the greatest discriminant capacity in distinguishing FES and CHR from healthy controls, and between two high-risk samples.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/265136
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 5.813
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.843

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChu, OKA-
dc.contributor.authorChang, WC-
dc.contributor.authorChan, KW-
dc.contributor.authorLee, HME-
dc.contributor.authorHui, CLM-
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYH-
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-20T02:00:51Z-
dc.date.available2018-11-20T02:00:51Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Medicine, 2019, v. 49 n.11, p. 1929-1936-
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/265136-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Cognitive impairment is a core feature of schizophrenia and has been observed in both familial (FHR) and clinical high-risk (CHR) samples. Nonetheless, there is a paucity of research directly contrasting cognitive profiles in these two high-risk states and first-episode schizophrenia. This study aimed to compare cognitive functions in patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder (FES), their unaffected siblings (FHR), CHR individuals and healthy controls. Method: A standardized battery of cognitive assessments was administered to 69 FES patients, 71 help-seeking CHR individuals without family history of psychotic disorder, 50 FHR participants and 68 controls. FES and CHR participants were recruited from territory-wide early intervention service for psychosis in Hong Kong. CHR status was ascertained using Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental State. Results: Among four groups, FES patients displayed the largest global cognitive impairment and had medium-to-large deficits across all cognitive tests relative to controls. CHR and FHR participants significantly underperformed in most cognitive tests than controls. Among various cognitive tests, digit symbol coding demonstrated the greatest magnitude of impairment in FES and CHR groups compared with controls. No significant difference between two high-risk groups was observed in global cognition and all individual cognitive tests except digit symbol coding which showed greater deficits in CHR than in FHR participants. Conclusion: Clinical and familial risk groups experienced largely comparable cognitive impairment that was intermediate between FES and controls. Digit symbol coding may have the greatest discriminant capacity in distinguishing FES and CHR from healthy controls, and between two high-risk samples.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM-
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Medicine-
dc.rightsPsychological Medicine. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.-
dc.rightsThis article has been published in a revised form in [Journal] [http://doi.org/XXX]. This version is free to view and download for private research and study only. Not for re-distribution, re-sale or use in derivative works. © copyright holder.-
dc.subjectCognitive impairment-
dc.subjectAt-risk mental state-
dc.subjectGenetic high-risk-
dc.subjectProcessing speed-
dc.subjectFirst-episode psychosis-
dc.titleComparison of cognitive functions between first-episode schizophrenia patients, their unaffected siblings and individuals at clinical high-risk for psychosis-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChu, OKA: aokchu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChang, WC: changwc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, KW: kwsherry@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, HME: edwinlhm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHui, CLM: christyh@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChang, WC=rp01465-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KW=rp00539-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, HME=rp01575-
dc.identifier.authorityHui, CLM=rp01993-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291718002726-
dc.identifier.pmid30226125-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85053820671-
dc.identifier.hkuros295889-
dc.identifier.volume49-
dc.identifier.issue11-
dc.identifier.spage1929-
dc.identifier.epage1936-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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