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Article: Money Helps When Money Feels: Money Anthropomorphism Increases Charitable Giving

TitleMoney Helps When Money Feels: Money Anthropomorphism Increases Charitable Giving
Authors
KeywordsMoney reminders
Money anthropomorphism
Mind perception
Warmth
Competence
Issue Date2019
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcr.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Journal of Consumer Research, 2019, v. 45 n. 5, p. 953–972 How to Cite?
AbstractAcross five studies, the current research demonstrates that imbuing money with humanlike characteristics can enhance charitable giving. Based on mind perception theory, we propose that anthropomorphizing money can induce people to attribute to money the capacity to feel and sense (i.e., warmth) and the capacity to do things (i.e., competence). Further, we argue that enhanced warmth perception increases charitable giving. Studies 1a and 1b provided initial evidence that money anthropomorphism increased charitable giving by measuring real monetary donation behavior (study 1a) and by adopting a practical method to anthropomorphize money in charitable appeals (study 1b). Study 2 showed that money anthropomorphism enhanced both warmth and competence perceptions of money, but that only enhanced warmth perception increased donation intention. Study 3 showed that money anthropomorphism did not enhance other types of charitable giving, such as signature provision. Study 4 showed that the money anthropomorphism effect was unique to money and that anthropomorphizing other financial instruments, such as a credit card, did not induce the same effect.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/258910
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 3.535
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.896

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhou, X-
dc.contributor.authorKim, S-
dc.contributor.authorWang, L-
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-03T03:57:55Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-03T03:57:55Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Consumer Research, 2019, v. 45 n. 5, p. 953–972-
dc.identifier.issn0093-5301-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/258910-
dc.description.abstractAcross five studies, the current research demonstrates that imbuing money with humanlike characteristics can enhance charitable giving. Based on mind perception theory, we propose that anthropomorphizing money can induce people to attribute to money the capacity to feel and sense (i.e., warmth) and the capacity to do things (i.e., competence). Further, we argue that enhanced warmth perception increases charitable giving. Studies 1a and 1b provided initial evidence that money anthropomorphism increased charitable giving by measuring real monetary donation behavior (study 1a) and by adopting a practical method to anthropomorphize money in charitable appeals (study 1b). Study 2 showed that money anthropomorphism enhanced both warmth and competence perceptions of money, but that only enhanced warmth perception increased donation intention. Study 3 showed that money anthropomorphism did not enhance other types of charitable giving, such as signature provision. Study 4 showed that the money anthropomorphism effect was unique to money and that anthropomorphizing other financial instruments, such as a credit card, did not induce the same effect.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcr.oxfordjournals.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Consumer Research-
dc.rightsThis is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Journal of Consumer Research following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jcr/ucy012-
dc.subjectMoney reminders-
dc.subjectMoney anthropomorphism-
dc.subjectMind perception-
dc.subjectWarmth-
dc.subjectCompetence-
dc.titleMoney Helps When Money Feels: Money Anthropomorphism Increases Charitable Giving-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailKim, S: sarakim@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityKim, S=rp01613-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/jcr/ucy012-
dc.identifier.hkuros288703-
dc.identifier.volume45-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage953–972-
dc.identifier.epage953–972-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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