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Article: MERS-CoV in Arabian camels in Africa and Central Asia

TitleMERS-CoV in Arabian camels in Africa and Central Asia
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherOxford University Press.
Citation
Virus Evolution, 2017, v. 3 n. Suppl 1, p. vew036.045 How to Cite?
AbstractMiddle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causing infections in humans is genetically indistinguishable from the virus found in Arabian camels (dromedaries) in the Middle East. Although no primary human case of MERS was reported outside the Arabian Peninsula, camel populations in Africa are known to have high prevalence of antibodies against MERS-CoV. We carried out surveillance for MERS-CoV in dromedaries in Africa and Central Asia. By MERS-CoV spike pseudoparticle neutralization assay we confirmed that camel serum samples from African countries have high prevalence of MERS-CoV antibodies. Using RT-qPCR we detected MERS-CoV positives in camel nasal swabs from all different African countries from which samples were collected. However, dromedary serum and swab samples from Kazakhstan in Central Asia were negative for MERS-CoV by these assays. Phylogenetic analysis of the spike gene revealed that MERS-CoVs from Africa formed a cluster closely related to but distinct from the viruses from the Arabian Peninsula. Results from this study suggest that MERS-CoV is actively circulating in dromedary populations in Africa and the virus in Africa is phylogenetically distinct from that in the Middle East.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/247084
ISSN
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChu, KW-
dc.contributor.authorChan, MS-
dc.contributor.authorPerera, RAPM-
dc.contributor.authorMiguel, E-
dc.contributor.authorRoger, F-
dc.contributor.authorChevalier, V-
dc.contributor.authorPoon, LML-
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSM-
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-18T08:21:58Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-18T08:21:58Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationVirus Evolution, 2017, v. 3 n. Suppl 1, p. vew036.045-
dc.identifier.issn2057-1577-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/247084-
dc.description.abstractMiddle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causing infections in humans is genetically indistinguishable from the virus found in Arabian camels (dromedaries) in the Middle East. Although no primary human case of MERS was reported outside the Arabian Peninsula, camel populations in Africa are known to have high prevalence of antibodies against MERS-CoV. We carried out surveillance for MERS-CoV in dromedaries in Africa and Central Asia. By MERS-CoV spike pseudoparticle neutralization assay we confirmed that camel serum samples from African countries have high prevalence of MERS-CoV antibodies. Using RT-qPCR we detected MERS-CoV positives in camel nasal swabs from all different African countries from which samples were collected. However, dromedary serum and swab samples from Kazakhstan in Central Asia were negative for MERS-CoV by these assays. Phylogenetic analysis of the spike gene revealed that MERS-CoVs from Africa formed a cluster closely related to but distinct from the viruses from the Arabian Peninsula. Results from this study suggest that MERS-CoV is actively circulating in dromedary populations in Africa and the virus in Africa is phylogenetically distinct from that in the Middle East.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press.-
dc.relation.ispartofVirus Evolution-
dc.rightsPre-print: Journal Title] ©: [year] [owner as specified on the article] Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of xxxxxx]. All rights reserved. Pre-print (Once an article is published, preprint notice should be amended to): This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the Article as published in the print edition of the Journal.] Post-print: This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in [insert journal title] following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version [insert complete citation information here] is available online at: xxxxxxx [insert URL that the author will receive upon publication here].-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleMERS-CoV in Arabian camels in Africa and Central Asia-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChu, KW: dkwchu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, MS: samuelms@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPerera, RAPM: mahenp@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPoon, LML: llmpoon@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityPoon, LML=rp00484-
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ve/vew036.045-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC5565921-
dc.identifier.hkuros280894-
dc.identifier.volume3-
dc.identifier.issueSuppl 1-
dc.identifier.spagevew036.045-
dc.identifier.epagevew036.045-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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