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Article: Particulate matter from re-suspended mineral dust and emergency cause-specific respiratory hospitalizations in Hong Kong

TitleParticulate matter from re-suspended mineral dust and emergency cause-specific respiratory hospitalizations in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/atmosenv
Citation
Atmospheric Environment, 2017, v. 165, p. 191-197 How to Cite?
AbstractWhile contribution from non-exhaust particulate matter (PM) emissions towards traffic-related emissions is increasing, few epidemiologic evidence of their health impact is available. We examined the association of short-term exposure to PM10 apportioned to re-suspended mineral dust with emergency hospitalizations for three major respiratory causes in Hong Kong between 2001 and 2008. Time-series regression model was constructed to examine association of PM10 from re-suspended mineral dust with emergency hospitalizations for upper respiratory infection (URI), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma at exposure lag 0–5 days, adjusting for time trends, seasonality, temperature and relative humidity. An interquartile range (6.8 μg/m3) increment in re-suspended mineral dust on previous day was associated with 0.66% (95% CI: 0.12, 0.98) increase in total respiratory hospitalizations, and 1.01% (95% CI: 0.14, 1.88) increase in URI hospitalizations. A significant 0.66%–0.80% increases in risk of COPD hospitalizations were found after exposure to re-suspended mineral dust at lag 3 or later. Exposure to mineral dust at lag 4 was linked to 1.71% increase (95% CI: 0.14, 2.22) in asthma hospitalizations. Associations from single-pollutant models remained significant in multi-pollutant models, which additionally adjusted for PM10 contributing from vehicle exhaust, regional combustion, residual oil, fresh sea salt, aged sea salt, secondary nitrate and secondary sulfate, or gaseous pollutants (i.e., nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, or ozone), respectively. Our findings provide insight into the biological mechanism by which non-exhaust pollution may be associated with risk of adverse respiratory outcomes, and also stress the needs for strategies to reduce emission and re-suspension of mineral dust. More research is warranted to assess the health effects of different non-exhaust PM emissions under various roadway conditions and vehicle fleets
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/242856
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 4.039
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.999
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPun, VC-
dc.contributor.authorTian, L-
dc.contributor.authorHo, KF-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-25T02:46:19Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-25T02:46:19Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationAtmospheric Environment, 2017, v. 165, p. 191-197-
dc.identifier.issn1352-2310-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/242856-
dc.description.abstractWhile contribution from non-exhaust particulate matter (PM) emissions towards traffic-related emissions is increasing, few epidemiologic evidence of their health impact is available. We examined the association of short-term exposure to PM10 apportioned to re-suspended mineral dust with emergency hospitalizations for three major respiratory causes in Hong Kong between 2001 and 2008. Time-series regression model was constructed to examine association of PM10 from re-suspended mineral dust with emergency hospitalizations for upper respiratory infection (URI), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma at exposure lag 0–5 days, adjusting for time trends, seasonality, temperature and relative humidity. An interquartile range (6.8 μg/m3) increment in re-suspended mineral dust on previous day was associated with 0.66% (95% CI: 0.12, 0.98) increase in total respiratory hospitalizations, and 1.01% (95% CI: 0.14, 1.88) increase in URI hospitalizations. A significant 0.66%–0.80% increases in risk of COPD hospitalizations were found after exposure to re-suspended mineral dust at lag 3 or later. Exposure to mineral dust at lag 4 was linked to 1.71% increase (95% CI: 0.14, 2.22) in asthma hospitalizations. Associations from single-pollutant models remained significant in multi-pollutant models, which additionally adjusted for PM10 contributing from vehicle exhaust, regional combustion, residual oil, fresh sea salt, aged sea salt, secondary nitrate and secondary sulfate, or gaseous pollutants (i.e., nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, or ozone), respectively. Our findings provide insight into the biological mechanism by which non-exhaust pollution may be associated with risk of adverse respiratory outcomes, and also stress the needs for strategies to reduce emission and re-suspension of mineral dust. More research is warranted to assess the health effects of different non-exhaust PM emissions under various roadway conditions and vehicle fleets-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/atmosenv-
dc.relation.ispartofAtmospheric Environment-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleParticulate matter from re-suspended mineral dust and emergency cause-specific respiratory hospitalizations in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTian, L: linweit@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTian, L=rp01991-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.atmosenv.2017.06.038-
dc.identifier.hkuros273776-
dc.identifier.volume165-
dc.identifier.spage191-
dc.identifier.epage197-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000407665500017-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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