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Conference Paper: Student collaboration and engagement – is it more than flipping a classroom?

TitleStudent collaboration and engagement – is it more than flipping a classroom?
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
2nd Annual Learning and teaching Colloquium, Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University (XJTLU), Suzhou, China, April 2014 How to Cite?
AbstractAs the notion of a ‘flipped classroom’ takes hold, it is timely to consider the types of learning design that promote student collaboration and the efforts required by faculty to ensure their success. Student collaboration is part and parcel of an active approach. The operating premises are that, with heightened engagement with learning materials and greater flexibility and autonomy in their application, students working in productive groups will move into deeper thinking processes. In this talk, I examine some of the opportunities and fallacies of the flipped classroom notion and expand upon examples at The University of Hong Kong where the design of both the curriculum and learning spaces by teams of dedicated staff is supporting collaborative learning.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/239670

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBridges, SM-
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-29T01:57:50Z-
dc.date.available2017-03-29T01:57:50Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citation2nd Annual Learning and teaching Colloquium, Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University (XJTLU), Suzhou, China, April 2014-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/239670-
dc.description.abstractAs the notion of a ‘flipped classroom’ takes hold, it is timely to consider the types of learning design that promote student collaboration and the efforts required by faculty to ensure their success. Student collaboration is part and parcel of an active approach. The operating premises are that, with heightened engagement with learning materials and greater flexibility and autonomy in their application, students working in productive groups will move into deeper thinking processes. In this talk, I examine some of the opportunities and fallacies of the flipped classroom notion and expand upon examples at The University of Hong Kong where the design of both the curriculum and learning spaces by teams of dedicated staff is supporting collaborative learning.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnual Learning and teaching Colloquium-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleStudent collaboration and engagement – is it more than flipping a classroom?-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailBridges, SM: sbridges@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityBridges, SM=rp00048-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros229118-

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