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Conference Paper: The impact of intellectual capital on companies' performances: a study based on MAKE Award Winners and Non-MAKE Award Winner Companies

TitleThe impact of intellectual capital on companies' performances: a study based on MAKE Award Winners and Non-MAKE Award Winner Companies
Authors
KeywordsMAKE Award
Knowledge Management
Intellectual Capital
VAIC
Organizational Performance
Issue Date2016
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/719435/description#description
Citation
The 12th International Conference on Knowledge Management (ICKM 2016), Vienna, Austria, 10-11 October 2016. In Procedia Computer Science, 2016, v. 99, p. 181-194 How to Cite?
AbstractOrganizations believe that obtaining a knowledge management award will not only promote their brands but also enhance their business performance. However, this may or may not be the case as there is no definitive evidence that winning such an award would improve an organization’s business performance. The purpose of this study is to explore whether companies that have received the Most Admired Knowledge Enterprise (MAKE) Award boast a better business performance than those that did not get the award (non-MAKE winner companies). This research involves a quantitative analysis of business performance conducted based on the data collected from fifty-nine previous MAKE winners and fifty-nine comparable non-MAKE winner companies according to their market capitalization to identify similarities and differences. This study is limited by its small sample size and the difficulty of identifying the comparable companies as many award winning companies already receive world-class recognition. Based on the data analysis, capital efficiency (CEE) shows much higher explanatory power in the regression among MAKE award winners than their counterparts. Human capital efficiency (HCE) and value added intellectual capital (VAIC) are negatively correlated with ATO in non-MAKE winner companies. However, such correlation is not found in MAKE-award winners. Further implications are discussed in this paper.
DescriptionThis journal vol. entitled: International Conference on Knowledge Management, ICKM 2016, 10-11 October 2016, Vienna, Austria
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/232647
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Z-
dc.contributor.authorChen, Z-
dc.contributor.authorLui, TST-
dc.contributor.authorChu, SKW-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-20T05:31:26Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-20T05:31:26Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationThe 12th International Conference on Knowledge Management (ICKM 2016), Vienna, Austria, 10-11 October 2016. In Procedia Computer Science, 2016, v. 99, p. 181-194-
dc.identifier.issn1877-0509-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/232647-
dc.descriptionThis journal vol. entitled: International Conference on Knowledge Management, ICKM 2016, 10-11 October 2016, Vienna, Austria-
dc.description.abstractOrganizations believe that obtaining a knowledge management award will not only promote their brands but also enhance their business performance. However, this may or may not be the case as there is no definitive evidence that winning such an award would improve an organization’s business performance. The purpose of this study is to explore whether companies that have received the Most Admired Knowledge Enterprise (MAKE) Award boast a better business performance than those that did not get the award (non-MAKE winner companies). This research involves a quantitative analysis of business performance conducted based on the data collected from fifty-nine previous MAKE winners and fifty-nine comparable non-MAKE winner companies according to their market capitalization to identify similarities and differences. This study is limited by its small sample size and the difficulty of identifying the comparable companies as many award winning companies already receive world-class recognition. Based on the data analysis, capital efficiency (CEE) shows much higher explanatory power in the regression among MAKE award winners than their counterparts. Human capital efficiency (HCE) and value added intellectual capital (VAIC) are negatively correlated with ATO in non-MAKE winner companies. However, such correlation is not found in MAKE-award winners. Further implications are discussed in this paper.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/719435/description#description-
dc.relation.ispartofProcedia Computer Science-
dc.rightsAuthor holds the copyright-
dc.rightsOpen Access Article under the CC BY-NC-ND license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/-
dc.subjectMAKE Award-
dc.subjectKnowledge Management-
dc.subjectIntellectual Capital-
dc.subjectVAIC-
dc.subjectOrganizational Performance-
dc.titleThe impact of intellectual capital on companies' performances: a study based on MAKE Award Winners and Non-MAKE Award Winner Companies-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailLi, Z: zhenzhen@HKUCC-COM.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChu, SKW: samchu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChu, SKW=rp00897-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.procs.2016.09.110-
dc.identifier.hkuros264480-
dc.identifier.volume99-
dc.identifier.spage181-
dc.identifier.epage194-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 161116-

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