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Article: Bennett's Expressive Justification of Punishment

TitleBennett's Expressive Justification of Punishment
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherSpringer.
Citation
Criminal Law and Philosophy, 2016 How to Cite?
AbstractIn this paper, I will critically assess the expressive justification of punishment recently offered by Christopher Bennett in The Apology Ritual and a number of papers. I will first draw a distinction between three conceptions of expression: communicative, motivational, and symbolic. After briefly demonstrating the difficulties of using the first two conceptions of expression to ground punishment and showing that Bennett does not ultimately rely on those two conceptions, I argue that Bennett’s account does not succeed because he fails to establish the following claims: (1) punishment is the only symbolically adequate response to a wrongdoing; and (2) punishment is permissible if it is the only symbolically adequate response to a wrongdoing.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227312

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChau, SC-
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-18T09:09:44Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-18T09:09:44Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationCriminal Law and Philosophy, 2016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227312-
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, I will critically assess the expressive justification of punishment recently offered by Christopher Bennett in The Apology Ritual and a number of papers. I will first draw a distinction between three conceptions of expression: communicative, motivational, and symbolic. After briefly demonstrating the difficulties of using the first two conceptions of expression to ground punishment and showing that Bennett does not ultimately rely on those two conceptions, I argue that Bennett’s account does not succeed because he fails to establish the following claims: (1) punishment is the only symbolically adequate response to a wrongdoing; and (2) punishment is permissible if it is the only symbolically adequate response to a wrongdoing.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer. -
dc.relation.ispartofCriminal Law and Philosophy-
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/[insert DOI]-
dc.titleBennett's Expressive Justification of Punishment-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChau, SC: pscchau@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChau, SC=rp01529-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11572-016-9394-5-
dc.identifier.hkuros259210-

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