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Article: Self-stigma and affiliate stigma in first-episode psychosis patients and their caregivers

TitleSelf-stigma and affiliate stigma in first-episode psychosis patients and their caregivers
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherSpringer Medizin. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/steinkopff/psychiatrie/journal/127
Citation
Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 2016, v. 51 n. 9, p. 1225–1231 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: Stigma is a major factor causing delayed help-seeking and poor treatment adherence in patients with psychotic disorders. Previous research has mostly focused on chronic samples and the impact of culturally-relevant variables on both patients’ and their caregivers’ stigmatization is understudied. This study aimed to examine the relationships between various forms of stigma, 'face concern', and clinical characteristics in a group of Chinese first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients and their caregivers. Methods: Forty-four Hong Kong Chinese aged 15–54 years presenting with FEP to psychiatric services and their caregivers were recruited. Assessments on self-stigma, affiliate stigma, perceived public stigma, 'face concern', symptom severity and subjective quality of life (QoL) were conducted. Results: Self-stigma of FEP patients was correlated with perceived public stigma, 'face concern', insight and psychological health of QoL. Multiple regression analysis revealed that perceived public stigma and 'face concern' independently predicted self-stigma. Mediation analysis further suggested that 'face concern' partially mediated the relationship between perceived public stigma and self-stigma. Caregivers’ affiliate stigma was significantly associated with higher levels of stress, and symptoms of depression and anxiety. Affiliate stigma did not correlate with perceived public stigma and 'face concern'. Conclusion: Our results indicate a critical role of perceived public stigma and fear of losing face in determining self-stigma in Chinese patients with FEP. Caregivers with greater degree of affiliate stigma experience increased stress and emotional distress. Our findings highlight the importance to examine culturally specific factors that may contribute to the development of self-stigma in first-episode populations of different ethnicities.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/226397
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.513
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.095

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, SM-
dc.contributor.authorChang, WC-
dc.contributor.authorHui, CLM-
dc.contributor.authorChan, KW-
dc.contributor.authorLee, HME-
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYH-
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-17T07:43:53Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-17T07:43:53Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 2016, v. 51 n. 9, p. 1225–1231-
dc.identifier.issn0933-7954-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/226397-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Stigma is a major factor causing delayed help-seeking and poor treatment adherence in patients with psychotic disorders. Previous research has mostly focused on chronic samples and the impact of culturally-relevant variables on both patients’ and their caregivers’ stigmatization is understudied. This study aimed to examine the relationships between various forms of stigma, 'face concern', and clinical characteristics in a group of Chinese first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients and their caregivers. Methods: Forty-four Hong Kong Chinese aged 15–54 years presenting with FEP to psychiatric services and their caregivers were recruited. Assessments on self-stigma, affiliate stigma, perceived public stigma, 'face concern', symptom severity and subjective quality of life (QoL) were conducted. Results: Self-stigma of FEP patients was correlated with perceived public stigma, 'face concern', insight and psychological health of QoL. Multiple regression analysis revealed that perceived public stigma and 'face concern' independently predicted self-stigma. Mediation analysis further suggested that 'face concern' partially mediated the relationship between perceived public stigma and self-stigma. Caregivers’ affiliate stigma was significantly associated with higher levels of stress, and symptoms of depression and anxiety. Affiliate stigma did not correlate with perceived public stigma and 'face concern'. Conclusion: Our results indicate a critical role of perceived public stigma and fear of losing face in determining self-stigma in Chinese patients with FEP. Caregivers with greater degree of affiliate stigma experience increased stress and emotional distress. Our findings highlight the importance to examine culturally specific factors that may contribute to the development of self-stigma in first-episode populations of different ethnicities.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer Medizin. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/steinkopff/psychiatrie/journal/127-
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology-
dc.titleSelf-stigma and affiliate stigma in first-episode psychosis patients and their caregivers-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChen, SM: smchen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChang, WC: changwc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHui, CLM: christyh@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, KW: kwsherry@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, HME: edwinlhm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChang, WC=rp01465-
dc.identifier.authorityHui, CLM=rp01993-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KW=rp00539-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, HME=rp01575-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007%2Fs00127-016-1221-8-
dc.identifier.pmid27118543-
dc.identifier.hkuros258234-
dc.identifier.volume51-
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.identifier.spage1225-
dc.identifier.epage1231-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

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