Article: Aerobic Exercise and Yoga Improve NeuroCognitive Function in Women with Early Psychosis

TitleAerobic Exercise and Yoga Improve NeuroCognitive Function in Women with Early Psychosis
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/npjschz/
Citation
NPJ Schizophrenia, 2015, v. 1, article no. 15047 How to Cite?
AbstractImpairments of attention and memory are evident in early psychosis, and are associated with functional disability. In a group of stable, medicated women patients, we aimed to determine whether participating in aerobic exercise or yoga improved cognitive impairments and clinical symptoms. A total of 140 female patients were recruited, and 124 received the allocated intervention in a randomized controlled study of 12 weeks of yoga or aerobic exercise compared with a wait-list group. The primary outcomes were cognitive functions including memory and attention. Secondary outcome measures were the severity of psychotic and depressive symptoms, and hippocampal volume. Data from 124 patients were included in the final analysis based on the intention-to-treat principle. Both yoga and aerobic exercise groups demonstrated significant improvements in working memory (P<0.01) with moderate to large effect sizes compared to the wait-list control group. The yoga group showed additional benefits in verbal acquisition (P<0.01) and attention (P=0.01). Both types of exercise improved overall and depressive symptoms (all P≤0.01) after 12 weeks. Small increases in hippocampal volume were observed in the aerobic exercise group compared with wait-list (P=0.01). Both types of exercise improved working memory in early psychosis patients, with yoga having a larger effect on verbal acquisition and attention than aerobic exercise. The application of yoga and aerobic exercise as adjunctive treatments for early psychosis merits serious consideration. This study was supported by the Small Research Funding of the University of Hong Kong (201007176229), and RGC funding (C00240 / 762412) by the Authority of Research, Hong Kong.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/223203
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, J-
dc.contributor.authorChan, SKW-
dc.contributor.authorLee, EHM-
dc.contributor.authorChang, WC-
dc.contributor.authorTse, MA-
dc.contributor.authorSu, WW-
dc.contributor.authorSham, PC-
dc.contributor.authorHui, CLM-
dc.contributor.authorJoe, GM-
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLW-
dc.contributor.authorKhong, PL-
dc.contributor.authorSo, KF-
dc.contributor.authorHoner, W-
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYH-
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-23T01:55:18Z-
dc.date.available2016-02-23T01:55:18Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationNPJ Schizophrenia, 2015, v. 1, article no. 15047-
dc.identifier.issn2334-265X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/223203-
dc.description.abstractImpairments of attention and memory are evident in early psychosis, and are associated with functional disability. In a group of stable, medicated women patients, we aimed to determine whether participating in aerobic exercise or yoga improved cognitive impairments and clinical symptoms. A total of 140 female patients were recruited, and 124 received the allocated intervention in a randomized controlled study of 12 weeks of yoga or aerobic exercise compared with a wait-list group. The primary outcomes were cognitive functions including memory and attention. Secondary outcome measures were the severity of psychotic and depressive symptoms, and hippocampal volume. Data from 124 patients were included in the final analysis based on the intention-to-treat principle. Both yoga and aerobic exercise groups demonstrated significant improvements in working memory (P<0.01) with moderate to large effect sizes compared to the wait-list control group. The yoga group showed additional benefits in verbal acquisition (P<0.01) and attention (P=0.01). Both types of exercise improved overall and depressive symptoms (all P≤0.01) after 12 weeks. Small increases in hippocampal volume were observed in the aerobic exercise group compared with wait-list (P=0.01). Both types of exercise improved working memory in early psychosis patients, with yoga having a larger effect on verbal acquisition and attention than aerobic exercise. The application of yoga and aerobic exercise as adjunctive treatments for early psychosis merits serious consideration. This study was supported by the Small Research Funding of the University of Hong Kong (201007176229), and RGC funding (C00240 / 762412) by the Authority of Research, Hong Kong.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/npjschz/-
dc.relation.ispartofNPJ Schizophrenia-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleAerobic Exercise and Yoga Improve NeuroCognitive Function in Women with Early Psychosis-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLin, J: jxlin@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, SKW: kwsherry@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, EHM: edwinlhm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChang, WC: changwc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTse, MA: matse@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSham, PC: pcsham@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHui, CLM: christyh@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailJoe, GM: glenj@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailKhong, PL: plkhong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSo, KF: hrmaskf@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SKW=rp00539-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, EHM=rp01575-
dc.identifier.authorityChang, WC=rp01465-
dc.identifier.authoritySham, PC=rp00459-
dc.identifier.authorityHui, CLM=rp01993-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579-
dc.identifier.authorityKhong, PL=rp00467-
dc.identifier.authoritySo, KF=rp00329-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/npjschz.2015.47-
dc.identifier.hkuros257016-
dc.identifier.volume1-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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