File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
  • Find via Find It@HKUL
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Gender differences in correlates of neurocognition and functioning in first-episode psychosis

TitleGender differences in correlates of neurocognition and functioning in first-episode psychosis
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://easap.asia/index.htm
Citation
The 2014 Regional Congress of the World Psychiatric Association (WPA), Hong Kong, 12-14 December 2014. In East Asian Archives of Psychiatry, 2014, v. 24 n. 4 suppl., p. 102, abstract G13 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: Gender differences are extensively studied in schizophrenia, with distinct profiles in demography, symptoms, and prognosis. However, findings in cognitive functioning have been mixed.1,2 This study examined sex differences in associations between demographics, symptoms and cognition, and investigated predictors of cognition in a large sample of patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP) in Hong Kong. METHODS: A total of 360 adult-onset FEP patients were administered a comprehensive battery of neurocognitive tests upon admission into a specialised early intervention service. Detailed demographic, clinical, and functioning data were also collected. RESULTS: Bivariate correlation analysis showed that duration of untreated psychosis was significantly associated with affective symptom severity in men. Memory and working memory were more significantly associated with onset age, negative symptoms, and side-effects in women. Processing speed was associated with antipsychotic dosage in men and side-effects in women. Selective attention was associated with positive and negative symptoms in women, and onset age and educational level in men. Executive function was associated with onset age and positive symptoms in women. All cognitive domains were significantly associated with educational level and functioning in both genders. Duration of untreated psychosis and disorganisation had no significant correlations. Linear regression analysis demonstrated that negative symptoms were predictive of cognition in both genders, while positive symptoms, medication side-effects, and affective symptoms were predictors in men and women, respectively. CONCLUSION: The data suggest that although there are common correlates, considerable heterogeneity exists in associations of symptoms and cognitive performance in men and women. Findings can inform more gender-specific tailoring of clinical treatment plans, such as cognitive remediation therapy.
DescriptionCongress Theme: Yin and Yang of Mental Health in Asia - Balancing Polarities
Category G – Schizophrenia and Psychotic Disorders: no. G13
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214257
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.331

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, A-
dc.contributor.authorHui, CLM-
dc.contributor.authorChang, WC-
dc.contributor.authorChan, SKW-
dc.contributor.authorLee, EHM-
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYH-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-21T11:05:01Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-21T11:05:01Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationThe 2014 Regional Congress of the World Psychiatric Association (WPA), Hong Kong, 12-14 December 2014. In East Asian Archives of Psychiatry, 2014, v. 24 n. 4 suppl., p. 102, abstract G13-
dc.identifier.issn2078-9947-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/214257-
dc.descriptionCongress Theme: Yin and Yang of Mental Health in Asia - Balancing Polarities-
dc.descriptionCategory G – Schizophrenia and Psychotic Disorders: no. G13-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Gender differences are extensively studied in schizophrenia, with distinct profiles in demography, symptoms, and prognosis. However, findings in cognitive functioning have been mixed.1,2 This study examined sex differences in associations between demographics, symptoms and cognition, and investigated predictors of cognition in a large sample of patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP) in Hong Kong. METHODS: A total of 360 adult-onset FEP patients were administered a comprehensive battery of neurocognitive tests upon admission into a specialised early intervention service. Detailed demographic, clinical, and functioning data were also collected. RESULTS: Bivariate correlation analysis showed that duration of untreated psychosis was significantly associated with affective symptom severity in men. Memory and working memory were more significantly associated with onset age, negative symptoms, and side-effects in women. Processing speed was associated with antipsychotic dosage in men and side-effects in women. Selective attention was associated with positive and negative symptoms in women, and onset age and educational level in men. Executive function was associated with onset age and positive symptoms in women. All cognitive domains were significantly associated with educational level and functioning in both genders. Duration of untreated psychosis and disorganisation had no significant correlations. Linear regression analysis demonstrated that negative symptoms were predictive of cognition in both genders, while positive symptoms, medication side-effects, and affective symptoms were predictors in men and women, respectively. CONCLUSION: The data suggest that although there are common correlates, considerable heterogeneity exists in associations of symptoms and cognitive performance in men and women. Findings can inform more gender-specific tailoring of clinical treatment plans, such as cognitive remediation therapy.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://easap.asia/index.htm-
dc.relation.ispartofEast Asian Archives of Psychiatry-
dc.relation.ispartof東亞精神科學志-
dc.rightsEast Asian Archives of Psychiatry. Copyright © Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.-
dc.titleGender differences in correlates of neurocognition and functioning in first-episode psychosis-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailHui, CLM: christyh@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChang, WC: changwc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, SKW: kwsherry@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, EHM: edwinlhm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHui, CLM=rp01993-
dc.identifier.authorityChang, WC=rp01465-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SKW=rp00539-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, EHM=rp01575-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros249136-
dc.identifier.volume24-
dc.identifier.issue4 suppl.-
dc.identifier.spage102, abstract G13-
dc.identifier.epage102, abstract G13-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats