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Conference Paper: Whole-body vibration as a potential treatment to improve phonatory function

TitleWhole-body vibration as a potential treatment to improve phonatory function
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong.
Citation
The 2015 Spring Symposium for Young Researchers in the Science of Learning, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 27-28 February 2015. In Programme Book, 2015, p. 5-6 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Whole-body vibration, the oscillatory movement transmitted from a mechanical vibration source to the body, has been shown to cause neurogenic adaption of the skeletal muscles and facilitate muscular function improvement (Cardinale & Wakeling, 2005). Phonatory function, in terms of intensity, has been found to improve following whole-body vibration at around 10 -15 Hz when compared to vibration below 10 Hz (Yokoyama and Hoshino, 1973). AIM: To identify whether whole-body vibration, compared to resonant voice training, would improve voice related quality of life and vocal function, in terms of maximum frequency and intensity. METHOD: Adults with self-perceived voice problems were randomly assigned to ...
DescriptionIn Adults with Voice Disorder
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213691

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, EA-
dc.contributor.authorYiu, EML-
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-12T02:23:01Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-12T02:23:01Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationThe 2015 Spring Symposium for Young Researchers in the Science of Learning, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 27-28 February 2015. In Programme Book, 2015, p. 5-6-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/213691-
dc.descriptionIn Adults with Voice Disorder-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Whole-body vibration, the oscillatory movement transmitted from a mechanical vibration source to the body, has been shown to cause neurogenic adaption of the skeletal muscles and facilitate muscular function improvement (Cardinale & Wakeling, 2005). Phonatory function, in terms of intensity, has been found to improve following whole-body vibration at around 10 -15 Hz when compared to vibration below 10 Hz (Yokoyama and Hoshino, 1973). AIM: To identify whether whole-body vibration, compared to resonant voice training, would improve voice related quality of life and vocal function, in terms of maximum frequency and intensity. METHOD: Adults with self-perceived voice problems were randomly assigned to ...-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong.-
dc.relation.ispartofSpring Symposium for Young Researchers in the Science of Learning-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleWhole-body vibration as a potential treatment to improve phonatory function-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailBarrett, EA: barrett1@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYiu, EML: eyiu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYiu, EML=rp00981-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros246678-
dc.identifier.spage5-
dc.identifier.epage6-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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