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Article: An alternative to a randomised control design for assessing the efficacy and effectiveness of bracing in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

TitleAn alternative to a randomised control design for assessing the efficacy and effectiveness of bracing in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherBritish Editorial Society of Bone and Joint Surgery. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bjj.boneandjoint.org.uk/
Citation
The Bone & Joint Journal, 2015, v. 97-B n. 7, p. 973-981 How to Cite?
AbstractRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed the efficacy of bracing for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis have suffered from small sample sizes, low compliance and lack of willingness to participate. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a comprehensive cohort study for evaluating both the efficacy and the effectiveness of bracing in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Patients with curves at greater risk of progression were invited to join a randomised controlled trial. Those who declined were given the option to remain in the study and to choose whether they wished to be braced or observed. Of 87 eligible patients (5 boys and 63 girls) identified over one year, 68 (78%) with mean age of 12.5 years (10 to 15) consented to participate, with a mean follow-up of 168 weeks (0 to 290). Of these, 19 (28%) accepted randomisation. Of those who declined randomisation, 18 (37%) chose a brace. Patients who were more satisfied with their image were more likely to choose bracing (Odds Ratio 4.1; 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 15.0; p = 0.035). This comprehensive cohort study design facilitates the assessment of both efficacy and effectiveness of bracing in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, which is not feasible in a conventional randomised controlled trial.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/211871
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.66
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.313

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYT-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KMC-
dc.contributor.authorWong, YW-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, WY-
dc.contributor.authorFu, ICY-
dc.contributor.authorKuong, EEYL-
dc.contributor.authorMak, KC-
dc.contributor.authorTo, MKT-
dc.contributor.authorSamartzis, D-
dc.contributor.authorLuk, KDK-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-21T02:14:19Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-21T02:14:19Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationThe Bone & Joint Journal, 2015, v. 97-B n. 7, p. 973-981-
dc.identifier.issn2049-4394-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/211871-
dc.description.abstractRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed the efficacy of bracing for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis have suffered from small sample sizes, low compliance and lack of willingness to participate. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a comprehensive cohort study for evaluating both the efficacy and the effectiveness of bracing in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Patients with curves at greater risk of progression were invited to join a randomised controlled trial. Those who declined were given the option to remain in the study and to choose whether they wished to be braced or observed. Of 87 eligible patients (5 boys and 63 girls) identified over one year, 68 (78%) with mean age of 12.5 years (10 to 15) consented to participate, with a mean follow-up of 168 weeks (0 to 290). Of these, 19 (28%) accepted randomisation. Of those who declined randomisation, 18 (37%) chose a brace. Patients who were more satisfied with their image were more likely to choose bracing (Odds Ratio 4.1; 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 15.0; p = 0.035). This comprehensive cohort study design facilitates the assessment of both efficacy and effectiveness of bracing in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, which is not feasible in a conventional randomised controlled trial.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBritish Editorial Society of Bone and Joint Surgery. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bjj.boneandjoint.org.uk/-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Bone & Joint Journal-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleAn alternative to a randomised control design for assessing the efficacy and effectiveness of bracing in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailFong, DYT: dytfong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KMC: cheungmc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, YW: yatwa@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, WY: lcheung@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailKuong, EEYL: eylkuong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailMak, KC: kincmak@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTo, MKT: mikektto@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSamartzis, D: dspine@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLuk, KDK: hrmoldk@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityFong, DYT=rp00253-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, KMC=rp00387-
dc.identifier.authorityFu, ICY=rp00254-
dc.identifier.authorityMak, KC=rp01957-
dc.identifier.authorityTo, MKT=rp00302-
dc.identifier.authoritySamartzis, D=rp01430-
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, KDK=rp00333-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1302/0301-620X.97B7.35147-
dc.identifier.pmid26130355-
dc.identifier.hkuros245562-
dc.identifier.volume97-B-
dc.identifier.issue7-
dc.identifier.spage973-
dc.identifier.epage981-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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