File Download
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Critical thinking in asynchronous online discussions: examining the role of the student facilitator

TitleCritical thinking in asynchronous online discussions: examining the role of the student facilitator
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherAACE.
Citation
The 2010 Global Conference on Learning and Technology, Penang, Malaysia, 17-20 May 2010. In Conference Proceedings, 2010, p. 4210-4215 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper is part of a larger study that investigates the types of facilitation techniques exhibited by student facilitators and how these techniques may foster in-depth levels of critical thinking in asynchronous online discussions. Data were collected from ten discussion forums, involving education major students. The top 30% of forums in terms of the most number of in-depth critical thinking incidences were first identified (i.e., higher-level group). Next, the bottom 30% forums were identified as the lower-level critical thinking group. Results indicated that student facilitators in the higher-level group acknowledged the participants’ contributions, and posted more questions than their counterparts in the lower-level forums. Facilitators in the high-level group also tended to pose questions throughout the entire discussion, unlike those in the lower-level group who only posted questions at the start of the discussion. Six types of questioning techniques were found. Directions for future research are proposed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/211570

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHew, KF-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, WS-
dc.contributor.authorJumain, SN-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-20T08:06:13Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-20T08:06:13Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationThe 2010 Global Conference on Learning and Technology, Penang, Malaysia, 17-20 May 2010. In Conference Proceedings, 2010, p. 4210-4215-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/211570-
dc.description.abstractThis paper is part of a larger study that investigates the types of facilitation techniques exhibited by student facilitators and how these techniques may foster in-depth levels of critical thinking in asynchronous online discussions. Data were collected from ten discussion forums, involving education major students. The top 30% of forums in terms of the most number of in-depth critical thinking incidences were first identified (i.e., higher-level group). Next, the bottom 30% forums were identified as the lower-level critical thinking group. Results indicated that student facilitators in the higher-level group acknowledged the participants’ contributions, and posted more questions than their counterparts in the lower-level forums. Facilitators in the high-level group also tended to pose questions throughout the entire discussion, unlike those in the lower-level group who only posted questions at the start of the discussion. Six types of questioning techniques were found. Directions for future research are proposed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAACE.-
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of Global Learn Asia Pacific 2010-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleCritical thinking in asynchronous online discussions: examining the role of the student facilitator-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailHew, KF: kfhew@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHew, KF=rp01873-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros245774-
dc.identifier.spage4210-
dc.identifier.epage4215-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats