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Article: Delusional disorder and schizophrenia: a comparison of the neurocognitive and clinical characteristics in first-episode patients

TitleDelusional disorder and schizophrenia: a comparison of the neurocognitive and clinical characteristics in first-episode patients
Authors
Keywordsneurocognition
first episode
Delusional disorder
schizophrenia
Issue Date2015
Citation
Psychological Medicine, 2015, v. 45, n. 14, p. 3085-3095 How to Cite?
AbstractDelusional disorder (DD) is thought to be distinct from schizophrenia (SZ). However, few systematic investigations have been conducted on DD because of the difficulty in ascertaining a representative sample size. Existing knowledge has been mostly generated from inpatient cohorts, which may be biased towards a more severe sample. Method. We compared the demographic, clinical and cognitive differences between 71 patients with first-episode DD and 71 age-matched patients with first-episode SZ. Participants were consecutively recruited from a population-based territory-wide study of early psychosis in Hong Kong targeting first-episode psychosis. Basic demographic information, premorbid functioning, duration of untreated psychosis, pathways to care, symptomatology, social, occupational, and cognitive functioning were comprehensively assessed using standardized measurements. Results. Patients with DD had less premorbid schizoid and schizotypal traits compared to patients with SZ. More patients with DD were married compared to patients with SZ. However, at first episode, there were no significant differences between the two groups in regards to the duration of untreated psychosis, pathways to care, symptom severity, neurocognitive performance, treatment, and functioning. Conclusions. Our findings challenge previous thinking that patients with DD had better functioning than patients with SZ. This study not only provides an updated perspective into conceptualizing the clinical differences between DD and SZ, but also expands the descriptive account of the two disorders to include the neurocognitive dimension.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210799
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.491
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.843

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHui, CLM-
dc.contributor.authorLee, HME-
dc.contributor.authorChang, WC-
dc.contributor.authorChan, KW-
dc.contributor.authorLin, J-
dc.contributor.authorXu, J-
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYH-
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-23T05:54:29Z-
dc.date.available2015-06-23T05:54:29Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Medicine, 2015, v. 45, n. 14, p. 3085-3095-
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210799-
dc.description.abstractDelusional disorder (DD) is thought to be distinct from schizophrenia (SZ). However, few systematic investigations have been conducted on DD because of the difficulty in ascertaining a representative sample size. Existing knowledge has been mostly generated from inpatient cohorts, which may be biased towards a more severe sample. Method. We compared the demographic, clinical and cognitive differences between 71 patients with first-episode DD and 71 age-matched patients with first-episode SZ. Participants were consecutively recruited from a population-based territory-wide study of early psychosis in Hong Kong targeting first-episode psychosis. Basic demographic information, premorbid functioning, duration of untreated psychosis, pathways to care, symptomatology, social, occupational, and cognitive functioning were comprehensively assessed using standardized measurements. Results. Patients with DD had less premorbid schizoid and schizotypal traits compared to patients with SZ. More patients with DD were married compared to patients with SZ. However, at first episode, there were no significant differences between the two groups in regards to the duration of untreated psychosis, pathways to care, symptom severity, neurocognitive performance, treatment, and functioning. Conclusions. Our findings challenge previous thinking that patients with DD had better functioning than patients with SZ. This study not only provides an updated perspective into conceptualizing the clinical differences between DD and SZ, but also expands the descriptive account of the two disorders to include the neurocognitive dimension.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Medicine-
dc.subjectneurocognition-
dc.subjectfirst episode-
dc.subjectDelusional disorder-
dc.subjectschizophrenia-
dc.titleDelusional disorder and schizophrenia: a comparison of the neurocognitive and clinical characteristics in first-episode patients-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChan, KW: kwsherry@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHui, CLM: christyh@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, HME: edwinlhm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChang, WC: changwc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLin, J: jxlin@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHui, CLM=rp01993-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KW=rp00539-
dc.identifier.authorityChang, WC=rp01465-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, HME=rp01575-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291715001051-
dc.identifier.pmid26036591-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84948103167-
dc.identifier.hkuros243784-

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