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Conference Paper: Early encoding of radical position legality in Chinese character reading: an ERP study

TitleEarly encoding of radical position legality in Chinese character reading: an ERP study
Authors
KeywordsAdults
Electroencephaolography (EEG)
Language
Chinese
Character reading
Issue Date2015
Citation
The 2015 Annual Meeting of The Organization for Human Brain Mapping (OHBM 2015), Honolulu, HI., 14-18 June 2015. How to Cite?
AbstractINTRODUCTION: In the alphabetic writing system, the identity and order of letters in a word have long been studied as important factors in reading. An analogous question in Chinese is how readers identify sublexical orthographic components called radicals and represent their positional information. Taft, Zhu, and Peng (1999) addressed this question by studying characters containing transposable radicals. Since transposable radicals can form multiple characters based on their spatial placements, if radicals are position-general they would activate multiple lexical representations and be harder to process. No difference was found in readers' performance for characters with transposable radicals and those with non-transposable radicals, which supported a position-specific account. Nevertheless, contending claims of position-general radical representations have also ...
DescriptionPoster Session: no. 2045
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210424

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYum, YNC-
dc.contributor.authorSu, IF-
dc.contributor.authorLaw, SP-
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-16T04:42:20Z-
dc.date.available2015-06-16T04:42:20Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationThe 2015 Annual Meeting of The Organization for Human Brain Mapping (OHBM 2015), Honolulu, HI., 14-18 June 2015.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210424-
dc.descriptionPoster Session: no. 2045-
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: In the alphabetic writing system, the identity and order of letters in a word have long been studied as important factors in reading. An analogous question in Chinese is how readers identify sublexical orthographic components called radicals and represent their positional information. Taft, Zhu, and Peng (1999) addressed this question by studying characters containing transposable radicals. Since transposable radicals can form multiple characters based on their spatial placements, if radicals are position-general they would activate multiple lexical representations and be harder to process. No difference was found in readers' performance for characters with transposable radicals and those with non-transposable radicals, which supported a position-specific account. Nevertheless, contending claims of position-general radical representations have also ...-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnual Meeting of The Organization for Human Brain Mapping, OHBM 2015-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectAdults-
dc.subjectElectroencephaolography (EEG)-
dc.subjectLanguage-
dc.subjectChinese-
dc.subjectCharacter reading-
dc.titleEarly encoding of radical position legality in Chinese character reading: an ERP study-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailYum, YNC: yumyenna@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSu, IF: ifansu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLaw, SP: splaw@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySu, IF=rp01650-
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, SP=rp00920-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros243673-

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