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Article: Having a family doctor was associated with lower utilization of hospital-based health services

TitleHaving a family doctor was associated with lower utilization of hospital-based health services
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherBioMed Central. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmchealthservres/
Citation
BMC Health Services Research, 2015, v. 15, article no. 42 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Primary care in the United States and most countries in Asia are provided by a variety of doctors. However, effectiveness of such diversified primary care in gate-keeping secondary medical services is unknown. This study aimed to evaluate health services utilization rates of hospital emergency and admission services among people who used different primary care doctors in Hong Kong. Method: This study was a population-based cross-sectional telephone survey using structured questionnaire on health services utilization rates and pattern in Hong Kong in 2007 to 2008. Information on the choice of primary care doctors, utilization rates and patterns of primary care service were collected. Poisson and logistic regression analyses were used to explore any differences in service utilization rates and patterns among people using different types of primary care doctors. Results: Out of 3148 subjects who completed the survey, 1896 (60.2%) had regular primary care doctors, of whom 1150 (60.7%) regarded their regular doctors as their family doctors (RFD). 1157 (36.8%) of them did not use any regular doctors (NRD). Only 4.3% of the RFD group (vs 7.8% of other regular doctors (ORD) and 9.6% of NRD) visited emergency service and only 1.7% (vs 3.6% of ORD and 4.0% of NRD) were admitted to hospital for their last episode of illness. Regression analyses controlling for sociodemographics and health status confirmed that respondents having RFD were less likely to use emergency service than people who had NRD (OR 0.479) or ORD (OR 0.624) or being admitted to hospital (OR 0.458 vs NRD and 0.514 vs ORD) for their last episode of illness. Conclusion: Primary care is most effective in gate-keeping secondary care among people with regular family doctors. People without any regular primary care doctor were more likely to use emergency service as primary care. The findings supported a family doctor-led primary care model. Trial registration number. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01422031.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208226
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.606
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.128
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFung, SCCen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, CKHen_US
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYTen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, CLKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-23T08:09:26Z-
dc.date.available2015-02-23T08:09:26Z-
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.citationBMC Health Services Research, 2015, v. 15, article no. 42en_US
dc.identifier.issn1472-6963-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208226-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Primary care in the United States and most countries in Asia are provided by a variety of doctors. However, effectiveness of such diversified primary care in gate-keeping secondary medical services is unknown. This study aimed to evaluate health services utilization rates of hospital emergency and admission services among people who used different primary care doctors in Hong Kong. Method: This study was a population-based cross-sectional telephone survey using structured questionnaire on health services utilization rates and pattern in Hong Kong in 2007 to 2008. Information on the choice of primary care doctors, utilization rates and patterns of primary care service were collected. Poisson and logistic regression analyses were used to explore any differences in service utilization rates and patterns among people using different types of primary care doctors. Results: Out of 3148 subjects who completed the survey, 1896 (60.2%) had regular primary care doctors, of whom 1150 (60.7%) regarded their regular doctors as their family doctors (RFD). 1157 (36.8%) of them did not use any regular doctors (NRD). Only 4.3% of the RFD group (vs 7.8% of other regular doctors (ORD) and 9.6% of NRD) visited emergency service and only 1.7% (vs 3.6% of ORD and 4.0% of NRD) were admitted to hospital for their last episode of illness. Regression analyses controlling for sociodemographics and health status confirmed that respondents having RFD were less likely to use emergency service than people who had NRD (OR 0.479) or ORD (OR 0.624) or being admitted to hospital (OR 0.458 vs NRD and 0.514 vs ORD) for their last episode of illness. Conclusion: Primary care is most effective in gate-keeping secondary care among people with regular family doctors. People without any regular primary care doctor were more likely to use emergency service as primary care. The findings supported a family doctor-led primary care model. Trial registration number. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01422031.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmchealthservres/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Health Services Researchen_US
dc.rightsBMC Health Services Research. Copyright © BioMed Central.en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleHaving a family doctor was associated with lower utilization of hospital-based health servicesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailFung, SCC: cfsc@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, CKH: carlosho@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailFong, DYT: dytfong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, CLK: clklam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityFung, SCC=rp01330en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CKH=rp01931en_US
dc.identifier.authorityFong, DYT=rp00253en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, CLK=rp00350en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12913-015-0705-7en_US
dc.identifier.pmid25627936-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84928109062-
dc.identifier.hkuros242404en_US
dc.identifier.volume15en_US
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 42en_US
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 42en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000348820500003-

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