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Article: Perceived risk of relapse and role of medication: comparison between patients with psychosis and their caregivers

TitlePerceived risk of relapse and role of medication: comparison between patients with psychosis and their caregivers
Authors
KeywordsRelapse
Caregivers
Knowledge of medication
Medication adherence
Schizophrenia
Issue Date2014
Citation
Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 2014, v. 50 n. 2, p. 307-315 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose Studies have suggested that appraisal of relapse risk and knowledge of medications in relapse prevention may shape one's reactions towards an illness and treatment, and influence the illness outcome. The aim of this study is to explore patients' and caregivers' knowledge of medications, perceived chances of relapse and its predictors, as well as their relations with medication adherence. Methods Eighty patient-caregiver dyads participated in the study. Their knowledge about psychosis, specific knowledge about medications and course of illness of their own and their relatives, medication adherence and symptomatology of patients were assessed. Differences in knowledge between patients and caregivers were compared. The link between adherence with perceived relapse risk and consequences of stopping medication were explored. Multinomial regression analyses were performed to examine predictors of perceived relapse risk. Results More patients underestimated their chance of relapse and were unaware that stopping medication may lead to relapse. The lack of understanding about the effect of stopping medication of both caregivers and patients was related to poor medication adherence of patients. Patients perceived of having higher chance of relapse had more severe positive symptoms. Positive symptoms of patients and greater knowledge about psychosis of caregivers were related to higher caregivers' perceived relapse risk of their relative. Conclusions This study explored the views of patients and their caregivers on the perceived risk of relapse and role of medication in preventing relapse, and the potential significance. Specific interventions addressing these areas should be considered in developing relapse prevention programs. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207129
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.513
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.095

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, Kit Wa Sherry-
dc.contributor.authorWong, Men Heng Marian-
dc.contributor.authorHui, Christylai-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Edwin Ho Ming-
dc.contributor.authorChang, Wing Chung-
dc.contributor.authorChen, Eric Yu Hai-
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-09T04:31:27Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-09T04:31:27Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 2014, v. 50 n. 2, p. 307-315-
dc.identifier.issn0933-7954-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207129-
dc.description.abstractPurpose Studies have suggested that appraisal of relapse risk and knowledge of medications in relapse prevention may shape one's reactions towards an illness and treatment, and influence the illness outcome. The aim of this study is to explore patients' and caregivers' knowledge of medications, perceived chances of relapse and its predictors, as well as their relations with medication adherence. Methods Eighty patient-caregiver dyads participated in the study. Their knowledge about psychosis, specific knowledge about medications and course of illness of their own and their relatives, medication adherence and symptomatology of patients were assessed. Differences in knowledge between patients and caregivers were compared. The link between adherence with perceived relapse risk and consequences of stopping medication were explored. Multinomial regression analyses were performed to examine predictors of perceived relapse risk. Results More patients underestimated their chance of relapse and were unaware that stopping medication may lead to relapse. The lack of understanding about the effect of stopping medication of both caregivers and patients was related to poor medication adherence of patients. Patients perceived of having higher chance of relapse had more severe positive symptoms. Positive symptoms of patients and greater knowledge about psychosis of caregivers were related to higher caregivers' perceived relapse risk of their relative. Conclusions This study explored the views of patients and their caregivers on the perceived risk of relapse and role of medication in preventing relapse, and the potential significance. Specific interventions addressing these areas should be considered in developing relapse prevention programs. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology-
dc.subjectRelapse-
dc.subjectCaregivers-
dc.subjectKnowledge of medication-
dc.subjectMedication adherence-
dc.subjectSchizophrenia-
dc.titlePerceived risk of relapse and role of medication: comparison between patients with psychosis and their caregivers-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00127-014-0930-0-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84939888241-
dc.identifier.hkuros233346-
dc.identifier.eissn1433-9285-

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