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Article: Examining gender difference in adult-onset psychosis in Hong Kong

TitleExamining gender difference in adult-onset psychosis in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsSex difference
Cognition
Schizophrenia
Age of onset
Issue Date2014
Citation
Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 2014 How to Cite?
AbstractAim: Gender-specific treatment strategies for psychosis have been suggested in recent years. Data on gender difference were largely consistent regarding premorbid functioning, age of onset and negative symptoms; however, results regarding neurocognitive function and duration of untreated psychosis were mixed and inconclusive. In this study, we aimed at a thorough examination on the gender differences in 360 Chinese patients with first-episode psychosis in Hong Kong. Methods: From June 2009 to August 2011, participants were consecutively recruited from a population-based territory-wide study of early psychosis targeting first-episode psychosis in Hong Kong. Comprehensive data on basic demographics, premorbid functioning and schizoid and schizotypal traits, clinical, functioning, medication side effects and a battery of neurocognitive measures were collected upon entry into the service. Results: In 360 patients with first-episode psychosis aged between 26 and 55 years, 43.6% (n=157) were male and 56.4% (n=203) were female. Males had poorer premorbid functioning and adjustment, earlier age of onset, more negative symptoms and poorer functioning in terms of work productivity, independent living and immediate social network relationships at presentation of first-episode psychosis. Interestingly, our data indicate that males tend to be more educated, and also characterized by higher IQ, better neurocognitive performance on visual domain compared with females. Duration of untreated psychosis was not different between the two genders. Conclusion: Data from this homogeneous cohort of Chinese populations enabled tailored and culturally sensitive recommendation on gender-specific treatment strategies, hence improving patients' care and facilitate better diagnostic and interventional decisions for patients with psychosis. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207096
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.889
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.071

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHui, Christylai-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Chungming-
dc.contributor.authorChang, Wing Chung-
dc.contributor.authorChan, Sherry Kit Wa-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Edwin Ho Ming-
dc.contributor.authorChen, Eric Yu Hai-
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-09T04:31:23Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-09T04:31:23Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationEarly Intervention in Psychiatry, 2014-
dc.identifier.issn1751-7885-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207096-
dc.description.abstractAim: Gender-specific treatment strategies for psychosis have been suggested in recent years. Data on gender difference were largely consistent regarding premorbid functioning, age of onset and negative symptoms; however, results regarding neurocognitive function and duration of untreated psychosis were mixed and inconclusive. In this study, we aimed at a thorough examination on the gender differences in 360 Chinese patients with first-episode psychosis in Hong Kong. Methods: From June 2009 to August 2011, participants were consecutively recruited from a population-based territory-wide study of early psychosis targeting first-episode psychosis in Hong Kong. Comprehensive data on basic demographics, premorbid functioning and schizoid and schizotypal traits, clinical, functioning, medication side effects and a battery of neurocognitive measures were collected upon entry into the service. Results: In 360 patients with first-episode psychosis aged between 26 and 55 years, 43.6% (n=157) were male and 56.4% (n=203) were female. Males had poorer premorbid functioning and adjustment, earlier age of onset, more negative symptoms and poorer functioning in terms of work productivity, independent living and immediate social network relationships at presentation of first-episode psychosis. Interestingly, our data indicate that males tend to be more educated, and also characterized by higher IQ, better neurocognitive performance on visual domain compared with females. Duration of untreated psychosis was not different between the two genders. Conclusion: Data from this homogeneous cohort of Chinese populations enabled tailored and culturally sensitive recommendation on gender-specific treatment strategies, hence improving patients' care and facilitate better diagnostic and interventional decisions for patients with psychosis. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofEarly Intervention in Psychiatry-
dc.subjectSex difference-
dc.subjectCognition-
dc.subjectSchizophrenia-
dc.subjectAge of onset-
dc.titleExamining gender difference in adult-onset psychosis in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/eip.12167-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84905636135-
dc.identifier.hkuros243450-
dc.identifier.eissn1751-7893-

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