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Article: The Association Between Clinical Parameters And Glaucoma-specific Quality Of Life In Chinese Primary Open-angle Glaucoma Patients

TitleThe Association Between Clinical Parameters And Glaucoma-specific Quality Of Life In Chinese Primary Open-angle Glaucoma Patients
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org.hk
Citation
Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2014, v. 20 n. 4, p. 274-278 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To investigate the association between clinical measurements and glaucoma-specific quality of life in Chinese glaucoma patients. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: An academic hospital in Hong Kong. Patients: A Chinese translation of the Glaucoma Quality of Life–15 questionnaire was completed by 51 consecutive patients with bilateral primary open-angle glaucoma. The binocular means of several clinical measurements were correlated with Glaucoma Quality of Life–15 findings using Pearson’s correlation coefficient and linear regression. The measurements were the visual field index and pattern standard deviation from the Humphrey Field Analyzer, Snellen best-corrected visual acuity, presenting intra-ocular pressure, current intra-ocular pressure, average retinal nerve fibre layer thickness via optical coherence tomography, and the number of topical anti-glaucoma medications being used. Results: In these patients, there was a significant correlation and linear relationship between a poorer Glaucoma Quality of Life–15 score and a lower visual field index (r=0.3, r2=0.1, P=0.01) and visual acuity (r=0.3, r2=0.1, P=0.03). A thinner retinal nerve fibre layer also correlated with a poorer Glaucoma Quality of Life–15 score, but did not attain statistical significance (r=0.3, P=0.07). There were no statistically significant correlations for the other clinical parameters with the Glaucoma Quality of Life–15 scores (all P values being >0.7). The three most problematic activities affecting quality of life were “adjusting to bright lights”, “going from a light to a dark room or vice versa”, and “seeing at night”. Conclusion: For Chinese primary open-angle glaucoma patients, binocular visual field index and visual acuity correlated linearly with glaucoma- specific quality of life, and activities involving dark adaptation were the most problematic.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205571
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.887
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.279

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, JWYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, CWSen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, JCHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Qen_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, JSMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-20T04:00:22Z-
dc.date.available2014-09-20T04:00:22Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Medical Journal, 2014, v. 20 n. 4, p. 274-278en_US
dc.identifier.issn1024-2708-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/205571-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To investigate the association between clinical measurements and glaucoma-specific quality of life in Chinese glaucoma patients. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: An academic hospital in Hong Kong. Patients: A Chinese translation of the Glaucoma Quality of Life–15 questionnaire was completed by 51 consecutive patients with bilateral primary open-angle glaucoma. The binocular means of several clinical measurements were correlated with Glaucoma Quality of Life–15 findings using Pearson’s correlation coefficient and linear regression. The measurements were the visual field index and pattern standard deviation from the Humphrey Field Analyzer, Snellen best-corrected visual acuity, presenting intra-ocular pressure, current intra-ocular pressure, average retinal nerve fibre layer thickness via optical coherence tomography, and the number of topical anti-glaucoma medications being used. Results: In these patients, there was a significant correlation and linear relationship between a poorer Glaucoma Quality of Life–15 score and a lower visual field index (r=0.3, r2=0.1, P=0.01) and visual acuity (r=0.3, r2=0.1, P=0.03). A thinner retinal nerve fibre layer also correlated with a poorer Glaucoma Quality of Life–15 score, but did not attain statistical significance (r=0.3, P=0.07). There were no statistically significant correlations for the other clinical parameters with the Glaucoma Quality of Life–15 scores (all P values being >0.7). The three most problematic activities affecting quality of life were “adjusting to bright lights”, “going from a light to a dark room or vice versa”, and “seeing at night”. Conclusion: For Chinese primary open-angle glaucoma patients, binocular visual field index and visual acuity correlated linearly with glaucoma- specific quality of life, and activities involving dark adaptation were the most problematic.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org.hk-
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Medical Journalen_US
dc.rightsHong Kong Medical Journal. Copyright © Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleThe Association Between Clinical Parameters And Glaucoma-specific Quality Of Life In Chinese Primary Open-angle Glaucoma Patientsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, JWY: jackylee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, CWS: cath0320@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, JCH: jonochan@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, Q: qinglee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLai, JSM: laism@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, JWY=rp01498en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, Q=rp01741en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLai, JSM=rp00295en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.12809/hkmj134062-
dc.identifier.pmid24584567-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84906317383-
dc.identifier.hkuros238311en_US
dc.identifier.volume20en_US
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage274en_US
dc.identifier.epage278en_US
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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