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Conference Paper: Network structure, position, ties and ICT use in distributed knowledge-intensive work

TitleNetwork structure, position, ties and ICT use in distributed knowledge-intensive work
Authors
Issue Date2008
Citation
Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW, 2008, p. 545-554 How to Cite?
AbstractIn this study, we develop a theoretical model based on social network theories and the social influence model to understand how knowledge professionals utilise technology for work and communication. We investigate the association between egocentric network properties (structure, position and tie) and information and communication technology (ICT) use of individuals in knowledge-intensive and geographically dispersed settings. Analysis from data collected using a reliable and validated questionnaire show that task-level ICT use is significantly associated with degree centrality and functional tie-diversity; and communication-level ICT use is negatively associated with efficiency. Implications of these associations for knowledge-intensive work are discussed in conclusion. Copyright 2008 ACM.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194253

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChung, K-
dc.contributor.authorHossain, L-
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-30T03:32:21Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-30T03:32:21Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW, 2008, p. 545-554-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194253-
dc.description.abstractIn this study, we develop a theoretical model based on social network theories and the social influence model to understand how knowledge professionals utilise technology for work and communication. We investigate the association between egocentric network properties (structure, position and tie) and information and communication technology (ICT) use of individuals in knowledge-intensive and geographically dispersed settings. Analysis from data collected using a reliable and validated questionnaire show that task-level ICT use is significantly associated with degree centrality and functional tie-diversity; and communication-level ICT use is negatively associated with efficiency. Implications of these associations for knowledge-intensive work are discussed in conclusion. Copyright 2008 ACM.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW-
dc.titleNetwork structure, position, ties and ICT use in distributed knowledge-intensive work-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1145/1460563.1460649-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70350219027-
dc.identifier.spage545-
dc.identifier.epage554-

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