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Conference Paper: Individual performance in knowledge intensive work through social networks

TitleIndividual performance in knowledge intensive work through social networks
Authors
Issue Date2007
Citation
SIGMIS-CPR 2007 - Proceedings of the 2007 ACM SIGMIS CPR Conference: The Global Information Technology Workforce, 2007, p. 159-167 How to Cite?
AbstractStudies in Information Systems (IS) research have widely documented task-oriented and communication structure effects as a result of information and communication technology (ICT) use. These effects have been evidenced at inter- and intraorganisational and occupational community levels. Research on the direct interplay between social network structure, ICT use and individual performance is however lacking to date. This research proposes a theoretical model along with operational constructs for understanding how performance of individuals in knowledge-intensive work can be affected by social network structure and ICT use. The context of the study is the occupational community of general practitioners (GP) in rural New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Numerous problems such as decreasing performance with age, obsolescence of technological knowledge, isolation from urban communities and various problems specific to rural practice makes this study significant. The study is motivated by the research question - "How can the interplay between social network structure and ICT use enhance individual performance?" It argues that individuals with high levels of ICT use, dense social network structures and those rich in connections to social clusters or groups who are themselves not well connected perform better. Copyright 2007 ACM.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194226

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChung, KSK-
dc.contributor.authorHossain, L-
dc.contributor.authorDavis, J-
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-30T03:32:19Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-30T03:32:19Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationSIGMIS-CPR 2007 - Proceedings of the 2007 ACM SIGMIS CPR Conference: The Global Information Technology Workforce, 2007, p. 159-167-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/194226-
dc.description.abstractStudies in Information Systems (IS) research have widely documented task-oriented and communication structure effects as a result of information and communication technology (ICT) use. These effects have been evidenced at inter- and intraorganisational and occupational community levels. Research on the direct interplay between social network structure, ICT use and individual performance is however lacking to date. This research proposes a theoretical model along with operational constructs for understanding how performance of individuals in knowledge-intensive work can be affected by social network structure and ICT use. The context of the study is the occupational community of general practitioners (GP) in rural New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Numerous problems such as decreasing performance with age, obsolescence of technological knowledge, isolation from urban communities and various problems specific to rural practice makes this study significant. The study is motivated by the research question - "How can the interplay between social network structure and ICT use enhance individual performance?" It argues that individuals with high levels of ICT use, dense social network structures and those rich in connections to social clusters or groups who are themselves not well connected perform better. Copyright 2007 ACM.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofSIGMIS-CPR 2007 - Proceedings of the 2007 ACM SIGMIS CPR Conference: The Global Information Technology Workforce-
dc.titleIndividual performance in knowledge intensive work through social networks-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1145/1235000.1235036-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34248142782-
dc.identifier.spage159-
dc.identifier.epage167-

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