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undergraduate thesis: Quantitative analysis of vocal fold vibration in vocally fatigued voice in high speed laryngoscopic images

TitleQuantitative analysis of vocal fold vibration in vocally fatigued voice in high speed laryngoscopic images
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Lo, C. [老正賢]. (2011). Quantitative analysis of vocal fold vibration in vocally fatigued voice in high speed laryngoscopic images. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.
AbstractThis study examined the vocal vibration pattern of fatigued voice by high speed laryngscopic imaging. A computer program, High Speed Video Processing (HSVP) program, was used to quantify the laryngscopic images using indices measuring glottal area, anterior-posterior length of the glottis and the width of the glottis. Twenty participants aged from 18 to 23 years (mean = 21.2 years, s.d. = 1.3 years) with normal voice were recruited to participate in a singing task. Vocal fatigue was induced through prolonged singing. High speed laryngscopic imaging was taken before and after the singing task. Images of /i/ phonation were analyzed using the HSVP program. Significant changes were found in the posterior glottal length ratio index and glottal length to width ratio index following vocal fatigue. It was hypothesized that vocal fatigue condition would lead to a compensatory hyperactive laryngeal adjustment. This lengthened the vocal folds anterio-posteriorly and made the glottis narrower. The high speed imaging technique using quantitative analysis has the potential for early identification of vocally fatigued voice.
DegreeBachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciences
SubjectVoice disorders
Vocal cords
Dept/ProgramSpeech and Hearing Sciences
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192896

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLo, Ching-yinen_US
dc.contributor.author老正賢en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-28T06:05:28Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-28T06:05:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationLo, C. [老正賢]. (2011). Quantitative analysis of vocal fold vibration in vocally fatigued voice in high speed laryngoscopic images. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192896-
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the vocal vibration pattern of fatigued voice by high speed laryngscopic imaging. A computer program, High Speed Video Processing (HSVP) program, was used to quantify the laryngscopic images using indices measuring glottal area, anterior-posterior length of the glottis and the width of the glottis. Twenty participants aged from 18 to 23 years (mean = 21.2 years, s.d. = 1.3 years) with normal voice were recruited to participate in a singing task. Vocal fatigue was induced through prolonged singing. High speed laryngscopic imaging was taken before and after the singing task. Images of /i/ phonation were analyzed using the HSVP program. Significant changes were found in the posterior glottal length ratio index and glottal length to width ratio index following vocal fatigue. It was hypothesized that vocal fatigue condition would lead to a compensatory hyperactive laryngeal adjustment. This lengthened the vocal folds anterio-posteriorly and made the glottis narrower. The high speed imaging technique using quantitative analysis has the potential for early identification of vocally fatigued voice.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)en_US
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong Licenseen_US
dc.subject.lcshVoice disordersen_US
dc.subject.lcshVocal cordsen_US
dc.titleQuantitative analysis of vocal fold vibration in vocally fatigued voice in high speed laryngoscopic imagesen_US
dc.typeUG_Thesisen_US
dc.identifier.hkulb5093438en_US
dc.description.thesisnameBachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciencesen_US
dc.description.thesislevelBacheloren_US
dc.description.thesisdisciplineSpeech and Hearing Sciencesen_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.date.hkucongregation2011en_US

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