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undergraduate thesis: A behavioral and ERP study of the role of radical position distribution in character recognition : evidence for position-specific radical representation

TitleA behavioral and ERP study of the role of radical position distribution in character recognition : evidence for position-specific radical representation
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Cheung, L. [張麗瑩]. (2011). A behavioral and ERP study of the role of radical position distribution in character recognition : evidence for position-specific radical representation. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.
AbstractThe present study investigated the role of radical position distribution in character recognition using a masked primed lexical decision task. Thirty-four normal adults (mean age: 22 years old) who were skilled readers of Chinese and native Cantonese speakers participated in the study. Radicals were used as the primes and complex characters were used as the targets. Participants were asked to judge whether the complex characters presented is a real character or not as quickly and accurately as possible. Response latencies, accuracy rates and ERP data were recorded. Behavioral data indicated that characters with position-biased related primes were recognized significantly faster than those with position-biased unrelated ones and the reverse was observed in position-neutral radical priming. ERP data only observed lexicality effect in N400 component. The findings have demonstrated the complex role of radical position distribution in character recognition and substantiated the argument for position-specific radical representation.
DegreeBachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciences
SubjectVisual evoked response
Dept/ProgramSpeech and Hearing Sciences
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192877

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Lai-yingen_US
dc.contributor.author張麗瑩en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-28T06:05:15Z-
dc.date.available2013-11-28T06:05:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationCheung, L. [張麗瑩]. (2011). A behavioral and ERP study of the role of radical position distribution in character recognition : evidence for position-specific radical representation. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/192877-
dc.description.abstractThe present study investigated the role of radical position distribution in character recognition using a masked primed lexical decision task. Thirty-four normal adults (mean age: 22 years old) who were skilled readers of Chinese and native Cantonese speakers participated in the study. Radicals were used as the primes and complex characters were used as the targets. Participants were asked to judge whether the complex characters presented is a real character or not as quickly and accurately as possible. Response latencies, accuracy rates and ERP data were recorded. Behavioral data indicated that characters with position-biased related primes were recognized significantly faster than those with position-biased unrelated ones and the reverse was observed in position-neutral radical priming. ERP data only observed lexicality effect in N400 component. The findings have demonstrated the complex role of radical position distribution in character recognition and substantiated the argument for position-specific radical representation.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)en_US
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong Licenseen_US
dc.subject.lcshVisual evoked responseen_US
dc.titleA behavioral and ERP study of the role of radical position distribution in character recognition : evidence for position-specific radical representationen_US
dc.typeUG_Thesisen_US
dc.identifier.hkulb5093357en_US
dc.description.thesisnameBachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciencesen_US
dc.description.thesislevelBacheloren_US
dc.description.thesisdisciplineSpeech and Hearing Sciencesen_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.date.hkucongregation2011en_US

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