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Conference Paper: Does knowledge about nature of Science facilitate conceptual understanding? A proposal of instructional intervention

TitleDoes knowledge about nature of Science facilitate conceptual understanding? A proposal of instructional intervention
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherWorld Association of Lesson Studies (WALS).
Citation
The 8th Annual International Conference of the World Association of Lesson Studies (WALS), Singapore, 28-30 November 2012. In the Abstract Book of the 8th Annual International Conference of the World Association of Lesson Studies (WALS), 2012 , p. 64-65, abstract no. D68-PP How to Cite?
AbstractUnderstanding nature of science (NOS) has been advocated as a central aim in science education because it facilitates science content learning. However, little evidence has been provided that supports this argument. This study is to explore if conceptual understanding of physics (mechanics) could be enhanced with an instructional intervention integrated with NOS ideas, and to test the integrative theory informing the intervention design to explain its mechanisms. The intervention consists of three components: (1) class preparation, (2) class instruction and (3) assignment. Class preparation is to help review previous learning and preview forthcoming lessons. Class instruction was designed based upon coordination between literature on studies of science (e.g., philosophy of science) and conceptual change in science education that informs processes students are intended to undergo and pedagogical elements each topic module would have. Students begin with constructing initial ideas about particular phenomena to explicate their prior knowledge. Then, they are guided to critically analyze and examine these ideas in terms of fit with empirical evidence, alignment in tool use for observation and measurement with science practice, consistency in defining concepts, and compatibility with existing knowledge. This contributes not only to bring about conceptual conflict, but to introduce a set of criteria for evaluating an idea as scientific or not, including structural and empirical nature of science knowledge. Next, guided by clarification of tentativeness of science explaining the necessity and benefit of idea revision, students are intended to develop science knowledge by modifying their initial ideas. Hereafter, the knowledge is evaluated against the criteria introduced previously. Finally, they are required to review how their knowledge develops and compare science knowledge with the initial ideas, in order to help understand why the former is superior to the latter. Class instruction would last for 15 lessons (40 minutes each) over a 4-week period. Assignment includes journal writing and practice to help reflect learning process and consolidate conceptual understanding. All the above content is contained in a student workbook. This study is expected to shed light on the construction of a subject matter-specific curricular model of NOS in secondary science education.
DescriptionPaper session
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/190191

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMA, Gen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-17T15:14:17Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-17T15:14:17Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 8th Annual International Conference of the World Association of Lesson Studies (WALS), Singapore, 28-30 November 2012. In the Abstract Book of the 8th Annual International Conference of the World Association of Lesson Studies (WALS), 2012 , p. 64-65, abstract no. D68-PPen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/190191-
dc.descriptionPaper session-
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding nature of science (NOS) has been advocated as a central aim in science education because it facilitates science content learning. However, little evidence has been provided that supports this argument. This study is to explore if conceptual understanding of physics (mechanics) could be enhanced with an instructional intervention integrated with NOS ideas, and to test the integrative theory informing the intervention design to explain its mechanisms. The intervention consists of three components: (1) class preparation, (2) class instruction and (3) assignment. Class preparation is to help review previous learning and preview forthcoming lessons. Class instruction was designed based upon coordination between literature on studies of science (e.g., philosophy of science) and conceptual change in science education that informs processes students are intended to undergo and pedagogical elements each topic module would have. Students begin with constructing initial ideas about particular phenomena to explicate their prior knowledge. Then, they are guided to critically analyze and examine these ideas in terms of fit with empirical evidence, alignment in tool use for observation and measurement with science practice, consistency in defining concepts, and compatibility with existing knowledge. This contributes not only to bring about conceptual conflict, but to introduce a set of criteria for evaluating an idea as scientific or not, including structural and empirical nature of science knowledge. Next, guided by clarification of tentativeness of science explaining the necessity and benefit of idea revision, students are intended to develop science knowledge by modifying their initial ideas. Hereafter, the knowledge is evaluated against the criteria introduced previously. Finally, they are required to review how their knowledge develops and compare science knowledge with the initial ideas, in order to help understand why the former is superior to the latter. Class instruction would last for 15 lessons (40 minutes each) over a 4-week period. Assignment includes journal writing and practice to help reflect learning process and consolidate conceptual understanding. All the above content is contained in a student workbook. This study is expected to shed light on the construction of a subject matter-specific curricular model of NOS in secondary science education.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWorld Association of Lesson Studies (WALS).-
dc.relation.ispartofThe World Association of Lesson Studies (WALS) International Conferenceen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleDoes knowledge about nature of Science facilitate conceptual understanding? A proposal of instructional interventionen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros223461en_US
dc.identifier.spage64, abstract no. D68-
dc.identifier.epage65, abstract no. D68-
dc.publisher.placeSingapore-

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