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Conference Paper: What are the cognitive-linguistic skills important to Chinese written composition in elementary grades?

TitleWhat are the cognitive-linguistic skills important to Chinese written composition in elementary grades?
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe Society for the Scientific Study of Reading
Citation
The 20th Annual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading (SSSR 2013), Hong Kong, 10-13 July 2013. How to Cite?
AbstractPURPOSE The present study examined the various cognitive-linguistic skill correlates of Chinese written composition among writers in different elementary grades. METHOD Participants in this cross-sectional study were 85 Chinese children in Grade 2, Grade 4 and Grade 6 in Hong Kong. They were administered measures of written composition and cognitive-linguistic skills (including rapid naming, verbal working memory, orthographic-motor skills, transcription skills, oral narrative skills, and syntactic skills) that were expected to be significant predictors of written composition. RESULTS The findings showed that Chinese written composition was significantly correlated with word spelling in Grade 2, stroke sequence knowledge and oral narrative skills in Grade 4, and working memory and oral narrative skills in Grade 6. CONCLUSIONS These results were consistent with the hypothesis that the relationships between cognitive-linguistic skills and written composition are different in different phases of development, consistent with the suggestions of Berninger, Mizokawa, and Bragg (1991) that children are faced with the constraints of attaining automaticity in producing written graphic units in early elementary grades and with linguistic constraints that affect the production of written words, sentences and paragraphs in higher elementary grades. The findings showed that the importance of orthographic-motor skills and transcription skills extended beyond Grade 2 and that working memory and oral narrative skills only become significant to written composition in Grade 6. Together, results underscore the importance of the unique characteristics of Chinese orthography and the impact of the discrepancy in oral language (Cantonese dialect) and written language (Standard Chinese) on children's writing development.
DescriptionSession - Written Composition: no. 5
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187088

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYeung, PSen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, CSHen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, DWen_US
dc.contributor.authorChung, KKHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T12:28:49Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T12:28:49Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 20th Annual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading (SSSR 2013), Hong Kong, 10-13 July 2013.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/187088-
dc.descriptionSession - Written Composition: no. 5-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE The present study examined the various cognitive-linguistic skill correlates of Chinese written composition among writers in different elementary grades. METHOD Participants in this cross-sectional study were 85 Chinese children in Grade 2, Grade 4 and Grade 6 in Hong Kong. They were administered measures of written composition and cognitive-linguistic skills (including rapid naming, verbal working memory, orthographic-motor skills, transcription skills, oral narrative skills, and syntactic skills) that were expected to be significant predictors of written composition. RESULTS The findings showed that Chinese written composition was significantly correlated with word spelling in Grade 2, stroke sequence knowledge and oral narrative skills in Grade 4, and working memory and oral narrative skills in Grade 6. CONCLUSIONS These results were consistent with the hypothesis that the relationships between cognitive-linguistic skills and written composition are different in different phases of development, consistent with the suggestions of Berninger, Mizokawa, and Bragg (1991) that children are faced with the constraints of attaining automaticity in producing written graphic units in early elementary grades and with linguistic constraints that affect the production of written words, sentences and paragraphs in higher elementary grades. The findings showed that the importance of orthographic-motor skills and transcription skills extended beyond Grade 2 and that working memory and oral narrative skills only become significant to written composition in Grade 6. Together, results underscore the importance of the unique characteristics of Chinese orthography and the impact of the discrepancy in oral language (Cantonese dialect) and written language (Standard Chinese) on children's writing development.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe Society for the Scientific Study of Reading-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading, SSSR 2013en_US
dc.titleWhat are the cognitive-linguistic skills important to Chinese written composition in elementary grades?en_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailYeung, PS: patcyy@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, CSH: shhoc@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChung, KKH: kevin@ied.edu.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYeung, PS=rp00641en_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, CSH=rp00631en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros220741en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros217896-

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