Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Moderate alcohol use and cardiovascular disease from mendelian randomization

TitleModerate alcohol use and cardiovascular disease from mendelian randomization
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
PLoS One, 2013, v. 8 n. 7, p. e68054 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground Observational studies show moderate alcohol use negatively associated with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, healthier attributes among moderate users compared to never users may confound the apparent association. A potentially less biased way to examine the association is Mendelian randomization, using alcohol metabolizing genes which influence alcohol use. Methods We used instrumental variable analysis with aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) genotypes (AA/GA/GG) as instrumental variables for alcohol use to examine the association of alcohol use (10 g ethanol/day) with CVD risk factors (blood pressure, lipids and glucose) and morbidity (self-reported IHD and CVD) among men in the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. Results ALDH2 genotypes were a credible instrument for alcohol use (F-statistic 74.6). Alcohol was positively associated with HDL-cholesterol (0.05 mmol/L per alcohol unit, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02 to 0.08) and diastolic blood pressure (1.15 mmHg, 95% CI 0.23 to 2.07) but not with systolic blood pressure (1.00 mmHg, 95% CI -0.74 to 2.74), LDL-cholesterol (0.03 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.03 to 0.08), log transformed triglycerides (0.03 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.01 to 0.08) or log transformed fasting glucose (0.01 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.006 to 0.03), self-reported CVD (odds ratio (OR) 0.98, 95% CI 0.76 to 1.27) or self-reported IHD (OR 1.10, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.45). Conclusion Low to moderate alcohol use among men had the expected effects on most CVD risk factors but not fasting glucose. Larger studies are needed to confirm the null associations with IHD, CVD and fasting glucose.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/186389
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAu Yeung, SLR-
dc.contributor.authorJiang, C-
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KK-
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJ-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, B-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, W-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GM-
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CM-
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T12:06:52Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T12:06:52Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One, 2013, v. 8 n. 7, p. e68054-
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/186389-
dc.description.abstractBackground Observational studies show moderate alcohol use negatively associated with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, healthier attributes among moderate users compared to never users may confound the apparent association. A potentially less biased way to examine the association is Mendelian randomization, using alcohol metabolizing genes which influence alcohol use. Methods We used instrumental variable analysis with aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) genotypes (AA/GA/GG) as instrumental variables for alcohol use to examine the association of alcohol use (10 g ethanol/day) with CVD risk factors (blood pressure, lipids and glucose) and morbidity (self-reported IHD and CVD) among men in the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. Results ALDH2 genotypes were a credible instrument for alcohol use (F-statistic 74.6). Alcohol was positively associated with HDL-cholesterol (0.05 mmol/L per alcohol unit, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02 to 0.08) and diastolic blood pressure (1.15 mmHg, 95% CI 0.23 to 2.07) but not with systolic blood pressure (1.00 mmHg, 95% CI -0.74 to 2.74), LDL-cholesterol (0.03 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.03 to 0.08), log transformed triglycerides (0.03 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.01 to 0.08) or log transformed fasting glucose (0.01 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.006 to 0.03), self-reported CVD (odds ratio (OR) 0.98, 95% CI 0.76 to 1.27) or self-reported IHD (OR 1.10, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.45). Conclusion Low to moderate alcohol use among men had the expected effects on most CVD risk factors but not fasting glucose. Larger studies are needed to confirm the null associations with IHD, CVD and fasting glucose.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action-
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS One-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleModerate alcohol use and cardiovascular disease from mendelian randomization-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailAu Yeung, SLR: ayslryan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailJiang, C: cqjiang@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheng, KK: chengkk@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailZhang, W: zhangws9@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460-
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0068054-
dc.identifier.pmid23874492-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3712994-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84880456406-
dc.identifier.hkuros218344-
dc.identifier.volume8-
dc.identifier.issue7-
dc.identifier.spagee68054-
dc.identifier.epagee68054-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats