File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Private supplementary tutoring: Comparative perspectives on patterns and implications

TitlePrivate supplementary tutoring: Comparative perspectives on patterns and implications
Authors
KeywordsOut-Of-School Education
Private Education
Tuition
Tutoring
Issue Date2006
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/03057925.asp
Citation
Compare, 2006, v. 36 n. 4, p. 515-530 How to Cite?
AbstractPrivate supplementary tutoring has long been a major phenomenon in parts of East Asia, including Japan, Hong Kong, South Korea and Taiwan. In recent times it has grown dramatically in other parts of Asia and in Africa, Europe and North America. The factors underlying the growth of private tutoring vary, but in all settings it has major implications for learning and livelihood. Families with the necessary resources are able to secure not only greater quantities but also better qualities of private tutoring. Children receiving such tutoring are then able to perform better in school, and in the long run to improve their lifetime earnings. By contrast, children of low-income families who do not receive such benefits may not be able to keep up with their peers and may drop out of school at an earlier age. Tutoring also of course has a direct impact on the livelihoods of the tutors, providing employment and incomes for a range of professionals and amateurs of different age groups. The dynamics of inter-relationships are complex, and vary from one setting to another. This paper argues that private supplementary tutoring deserves much more attention from policy makers and researchers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176103
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.802
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.493
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBray, Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:05:59Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:05:59Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationCompare, 2006, v. 36 n. 4, p. 515-530en_US
dc.identifier.issn0305-7925en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176103-
dc.description.abstractPrivate supplementary tutoring has long been a major phenomenon in parts of East Asia, including Japan, Hong Kong, South Korea and Taiwan. In recent times it has grown dramatically in other parts of Asia and in Africa, Europe and North America. The factors underlying the growth of private tutoring vary, but in all settings it has major implications for learning and livelihood. Families with the necessary resources are able to secure not only greater quantities but also better qualities of private tutoring. Children receiving such tutoring are then able to perform better in school, and in the long run to improve their lifetime earnings. By contrast, children of low-income families who do not receive such benefits may not be able to keep up with their peers and may drop out of school at an earlier age. Tutoring also of course has a direct impact on the livelihoods of the tutors, providing employment and incomes for a range of professionals and amateurs of different age groups. The dynamics of inter-relationships are complex, and vary from one setting to another. This paper argues that private supplementary tutoring deserves much more attention from policy makers and researchers.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/03057925.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCompareen_US
dc.subjectOut-Of-School Educationen_US
dc.subjectPrivate Educationen_US
dc.subjectTuitionen_US
dc.subjectTutoringen_US
dc.titlePrivate supplementary tutoring: Comparative perspectives on patterns and implicationsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailBray, M: mbray@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityBray, M=rp00888en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/03057920601024974en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33845468448en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33845468448&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume36en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage515en_US
dc.identifier.epage530en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBray, M=7103256593en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike4032831-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats