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postgraduate thesis: Obesity and type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes identified from recent genome-wide association studies: impact on Southern Chinese

TitleObesity and type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes identified from recent genome-wide association studies: impact on Southern Chinese
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Cheung, Y. C. [張語殷]. (2011). Obesity and type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes identified from recent genome-wide association studies : impact on Southern Chinese. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4784961
AbstractBackground and objectives: Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies conducted in Caucasian populations have significantly expanded the list of confirmed and potential susceptibility genes for obesity and type 2 diabetes. The major objective of this thesis was to establish the role of the previously identified obesity- and T2DM-susceptibility genes in the Hong Kong Southern Chinese population. Major findings: In a cross-sectional case-control study of Southern Chinese which involved 470 obese cases and 700 normal-weight controls, significant associations with obesity were demonstrated in 7 of 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that have shown significant associations with obesity and/or body mass index (BMI) in previous Caucasian GWA studies. These SNPs are located within or near the GNPDA2, FTO, MC4R, KCTD15, SFRS10-ETV5-DGKG, SEC16B-RASAL2 and NEGR1 loci. The combined genetic risk score (GRS) of the 13 studied SNPs was associated with an increased risk for obesity. The GNPDA2 rs10938397, FTO rs8050136, and MC4R rs17782313, which showed the most significant associations with obesity, were further examined for their associations with persistent central obesity and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Both rs8050136 and rs10938397 were significantly associated with persistent central obesity. rs10938397 was also associated with the MetS. The combined GRS of these 3 SNPs showed significant associations with both persistent central obesity and persistent MetS. Nineteen multimarker-tagging SNPs that span a well-defined LD block of the FTO gene were evaluated for their associations with obesity in a case-control study which involved 249 cases and 400 controls. rs16952522 was found to be significantly associated with obesity, in addition to the well-known SNP rs8050136. These 2 SNPs were nominally associated with T2DM, although the associations were abolished after adjustment for age, sex and BMI. However, the GA haplotype composed of the risk alleles of these 2 SNPs was significantly associated with T2DM, independent of BMI. Seventeen previously identified T2DM-associated SNPs were investigated for the associations with glycaemic progression in an 8-year follow-up study which involved 518 cases and 998 controls. Their combined GRS was associated with an increased risk for glycaemic progression. A significant association with glycaemic progression was found with CDKN2A/B rs10811661. Moreover, KCNJ11 rs5219 and IGF2BP2 rs11711477 also showed potential associations with glycaemic progression. In the subsequent 12-year follow-up study, which involved 200 cases and 903 controls, the CDKN2A/B rs10811661 showed a significant independent association with incident T2DM. The KCNJ11 E23K (rs5219) variant was examined for its association with diabetes development in a 12-year prospective study. It was found to be significantly associated with the development of prediabetes but not with the development of T2DM. However, in a meta-analysis which involved 15680 subjects across different populations, this variant could indeed predict T2DM. Conclusions: The findings of this thesis have provided novel evidence supporting the role of the GWA studies-identified obesity- and T2DM-associated genetic variants as genetic markers of obesity and T2DM among Southern Chinese in Hong Kong, and suggest that the GNPDA2, FTO and MC4R genes confer susceptibility to obesity and that the CDKN2A/B and KCNJ11 genes may play a role in diabetes development.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectObesity - China - Hong Kong - Genetic aspects.
Non-insulin-dependent diabetes - China - Hong Kong - Genetic aspects.
Dept/ProgramMedicine

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Yu-yan, Chloe.-
dc.contributor.author張語殷.-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationCheung, Y. C. [張語殷]. (2011). Obesity and type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes identified from recent genome-wide association studies : impact on Southern Chinese. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4784961-
dc.description.abstractBackground and objectives: Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies conducted in Caucasian populations have significantly expanded the list of confirmed and potential susceptibility genes for obesity and type 2 diabetes. The major objective of this thesis was to establish the role of the previously identified obesity- and T2DM-susceptibility genes in the Hong Kong Southern Chinese population. Major findings: In a cross-sectional case-control study of Southern Chinese which involved 470 obese cases and 700 normal-weight controls, significant associations with obesity were demonstrated in 7 of 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that have shown significant associations with obesity and/or body mass index (BMI) in previous Caucasian GWA studies. These SNPs are located within or near the GNPDA2, FTO, MC4R, KCTD15, SFRS10-ETV5-DGKG, SEC16B-RASAL2 and NEGR1 loci. The combined genetic risk score (GRS) of the 13 studied SNPs was associated with an increased risk for obesity. The GNPDA2 rs10938397, FTO rs8050136, and MC4R rs17782313, which showed the most significant associations with obesity, were further examined for their associations with persistent central obesity and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Both rs8050136 and rs10938397 were significantly associated with persistent central obesity. rs10938397 was also associated with the MetS. The combined GRS of these 3 SNPs showed significant associations with both persistent central obesity and persistent MetS. Nineteen multimarker-tagging SNPs that span a well-defined LD block of the FTO gene were evaluated for their associations with obesity in a case-control study which involved 249 cases and 400 controls. rs16952522 was found to be significantly associated with obesity, in addition to the well-known SNP rs8050136. These 2 SNPs were nominally associated with T2DM, although the associations were abolished after adjustment for age, sex and BMI. However, the GA haplotype composed of the risk alleles of these 2 SNPs was significantly associated with T2DM, independent of BMI. Seventeen previously identified T2DM-associated SNPs were investigated for the associations with glycaemic progression in an 8-year follow-up study which involved 518 cases and 998 controls. Their combined GRS was associated with an increased risk for glycaemic progression. A significant association with glycaemic progression was found with CDKN2A/B rs10811661. Moreover, KCNJ11 rs5219 and IGF2BP2 rs11711477 also showed potential associations with glycaemic progression. In the subsequent 12-year follow-up study, which involved 200 cases and 903 controls, the CDKN2A/B rs10811661 showed a significant independent association with incident T2DM. The KCNJ11 E23K (rs5219) variant was examined for its association with diabetes development in a 12-year prospective study. It was found to be significantly associated with the development of prediabetes but not with the development of T2DM. However, in a meta-analysis which involved 15680 subjects across different populations, this variant could indeed predict T2DM. Conclusions: The findings of this thesis have provided novel evidence supporting the role of the GWA studies-identified obesity- and T2DM-associated genetic variants as genetic markers of obesity and T2DM among Southern Chinese in Hong Kong, and suggest that the GNPDA2, FTO and MC4R genes confer susceptibility to obesity and that the CDKN2A/B and KCNJ11 genes may play a role in diabetes development.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B47849617-
dc.subject.lcshObesity - China - Hong Kong - Genetic aspects.-
dc.subject.lcshNon-insulin-dependent diabetes - China - Hong Kong - Genetic aspects.-
dc.titleObesity and type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes identified from recent genome-wide association studies: impact on Southern Chinese-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4784961-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineMedicine-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4784961-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

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