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undergraduate thesis: Role of intonation and sentence final particles in comprehension of irony in typically developing children and children with ASD

TitleRole of intonation and sentence final particles in comprehension of irony in typically developing children and children with ASD
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Abstract
This paper investigates the role of intonation cue and SFPs in the comprehension of verbal irony in Cantonese-speaking children with ASD and their typically developing (TD) peers. Thirteen children with ASD (8;3-12;9) were language-matched with 13 TD peers. By manipulating the two variables, 16 vignettes embedded with potentially ironic criticisms were constructed. The participants were asked to judge the belief and intention of the characters in the vignettes with reference to the remarks. Both groups performed similarly well in the judgement of the speaker’s belief. For the speaker’s intent, the clinical group performed significantly poorer and did not rely on either cue, whereas the control group depended more on SFPs than supra-segmental intonation cues. The differential patterns between the two groups were discussed in light of the literature on the theory of mind ability as well as the typological features of Cantonese.
Description"A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Bachelor of Science (Speech and Hearing Sciences), The University of Hong Kong, June 30, 2010."
DegreeBachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciences
SubjectIntonation (Phonetics)
Cantonese dialects -- Particles.
Autism spectrum disorders -- Patients -- Language.
Dept/ProgramSpeech and Hearing Sciences
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/173722

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi Pui-wingen_HK
dc.contributor.author李佩穎zh_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-01T01:14:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-01T01:14:09Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/173722-
dc.description"A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Bachelor of Science (Speech and Hearing Sciences), The University of Hong Kong, June 30, 2010."en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 24-29).en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (B.Sc)--University of Hong Kong, 2010.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper investigates the role of intonation cue and SFPs in the comprehension of verbal irony in Cantonese-speaking children with ASD and their typically developing (TD) peers. Thirteen children with ASD (8;3-12;9) were language-matched with 13 TD peers. By manipulating the two variables, 16 vignettes embedded with potentially ironic criticisms were constructed. The participants were asked to judge the belief and intention of the characters in the vignettes with reference to the remarks. Both groups performed similarly well in the judgement of the speaker’s belief. For the speaker’s intent, the clinical group performed significantly poorer and did not rely on either cue, whereas the control group depended more on SFPs than supra-segmental intonation cues. The differential patterns between the two groups were discussed in light of the literature on the theory of mind ability as well as the typological features of Cantonese.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong Licenseen_US
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.en_US
dc.subject.lcshIntonation (Phonetics)en_US
dc.subject.lcshCantonese dialects -- Particles.en_US
dc.subject.lcshAutism spectrum disorders -- Patients -- Language.en_US
dc.titleRole of intonation and sentence final particles in comprehension of irony in typically developing children and children with ASDen_HK
dc.typeUG_Thesisen_US
dc.identifier.hkulb4813190en_US
dc.description.thesisnameBachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciencesen_US
dc.description.thesislevelbachelor'sen_US
dc.description.thesisdisciplineSpeech and Hearing Sciencesen_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US

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